Carbon County Pennsylvania Groundwater Help to Hometown

The Keystone Clean Water Team has its roots in Carbon County, Pennsylvania.  The organization is attempting to educate and inform private well owners about issues related to water quality.  We were just recently contacted by someone in the Hometown Area that was having a problem.  He called and discussed the issues which appeared series.  we asked the person to email us with the details = but we have not received the information.

So – We decided to post this message !

1. If you called the Keystone Clean Water Team looking for help and spoke with Brian – please email us a cleanwater@carbonwaters.org.   Please provide a full description of the problem and type of information you have available and your street mailing address.
2. If you are having a problem with your well water in Carbon County, PA- please provide us a description of the problem and your mailing address.
3. We do not have the funds to fix any problems, but we do have the opportunity to compile the problems and attempt to compare the problems to known historic environmental hazards in the area.
4. If you are outside of Carbon County, PA and are having a problem – we would be happy to review any data, but we would also suggest running a Neighborhood Environmental Hazard Report.

Everything we do began with an idea.

Keystone Clean Water Team is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.    Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission), but we also do local educational workshops and local cellphone/small electronic recycling programs. If you would like to set up a program to help recycle cellphones at an event, business, or other organization.  Through our program we can recycle  cell phones, iPods, game systems, and small digital cameras.  If your interested, please contact us.  Our new PSAs.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).  Keystone Clean Water Team!
For more information, please go to KCWT’s About Page or contact us.  Follow us on Twitter 

Getting Well Water Tested Carbon County Pennsylvania

The Carbon County Environmental Education Center, in conjunction with the Keystone Clean Water Team, is offering a low-cost well-water testing opportunity for area residents.

Test kits are available now for pick-up at CCEEC. Homeowners may collect water samples, then return them on Sunday, April 19, from 1:00 to 3:00 pm, where Environmental Consultant and Hydrogeologist Brian Oram will perform certain tests immediately. Other results will be mailed confidentially within two weeks.

Two testing options are available: a $50 test includes total coliform, pH, iron, and other parameters, and a more comprehensive test is available for $95.

Homeowners with private wells are encouraged to test their water at least once each year, and area residents whose property might be impacted by any future development should consider testing to establish a baseline of well water quality.

For more information on this program, call CCEEC at (570) 645-8597. The Center is located at the west end of Mauch Chunk Lake Park, just outside Jim Thorpe, at 151 E. White Bear Drive in Summit Hill.

The program is underwritten by the Organizations Sponsors – Your Company or Business Can Sponsor- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJPOkLpWQo4

or Become an Individual Supporter – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbOXE7HS7PE

 

 

 

Northeast Pennsylvania Polycythemia Vera (PV) Investigation

Background

In 2004, using state cancer registry records, the Pennsylvania Department of Health (PADOH) found a PV cluster in northeast Pennsylvania. PV is part of a disease group called myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), which is a group of slow-growing blood cancers where the bone marrow makes too many red blood cells, white blood cells, or platelets.

In 2006, ATSDR was asked to help study PV patterns in the area. From 2007-2008, ATSDR reviewed medical records, conducted genetic testing, and confirmed this PV cluster.

In 2009, Congress funded ATSDR to continue this investigation. ATSDR is overseeing 18 projects with PADOH, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, and various universities and private organizations. These projects are based on recommendations from an expert panel. The panel identified four areas for investigation; epidemiology, genetics, toxicology, and environmental studies.

In 2014, the last of the contracts for the 18 different projects ended.

PV Research Projects Status Graphic March 2015  (The Graphic)

Status

The graphic, PV Research Projects Status Graphic March 2015  (The Graphic),  this provides a summary of the status of each of the 18 projects as of March 2015.  I’ve attached this graphic both as a “snapshot” in the body of this email, as well as a pdf attachment.  Projects highlighted in “green” in the attached graphic have work complete and a final product available (if applicable).  Projects highlighted in “yellow” have final products in progress and undergoing clearance.  Projects highlighted in “red” have final products that are anticipated but not yet started.  The shapes of the projects in the graphics give you an idea of the category of work of that project, as described in the key on the graphic.

As of March 23, 2015, work is complete and a final product is available (if applicable) for 12 projects.  We are happy to announce that 1 new project (#12) moved from yellow to green since my January 2015 update:

#12:  “Tri-County MPN Updated Surveillance Study“ conducted by the University of Pittsburgh is complete.  The published manuscript and ATSDR/CDC summary factsheet are available on the ATSDR website at:

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/polycythemia_vera/

The purpose of this study was to examine PV reporting to the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry (PCR) following the original ATSDR PV investigation; to determine whether other myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) were similarly underreported or falsely reported; and to determine whether a cancer cluster persisted in the follow-up period. The original ATSDR PV cancer cluster investigation was conducted in a tri county area in northeast Pennsylvania in 2006. This study was initiated to update and expand the original investigation.  These researchers found that:

  • *       Most MPN cases had been reported to the PCR but only about half were true cases.
  • *       Using the seven true PV cases identified, these researchers did not find any statistically significant clusters in space or in space-time in this updated analysis.
  • *       Using the eleven true CML cases, these researchers did not find any statistically significant clusters in space or in space-time in this updated analysis.
  • *       Using nine true ET cases, these researchers found a statistically significant cluster at the zip-code level when evaluated in space, but not in space-time.
  • *       The estimated incidence rates for most MPNs are lower than the rates calculated from the original PCR database.
  • *       The estimated PV incidence rate was 2.5 (0.8-5.1) per 100,000, 64% lower than the original rate based on PCR reports after correcting for completeness and accuracy.
  • *       The estimated ET incidence rate was 2.3 (0.6-3.8) per 100,000, slightly higher than the original rate based on PCR reports after correcting for completeness and accuracy.
  • *       However, the wide range of values for estimated incidence rates reflects the variability associated with the findings based on the low response rate. The response rate for this study was 26%. This means that approximately ¼ of the identified cases agreed to participate in this study.

Further, #13 “Case Control Study” conducted by Drexel University (reported as already complete when Carol Ann Gross-Davis’ PhD dissertation was completed as of the October 2014 update) now has a publicly available journal article published related to this effort.  This article is entitled “The Role of Genotypes That Modify the Toxicity of Chemical Mutagens in the Risk for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms” and is available online at:

http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/12/3/2465/html

This article describes Drexel’s population-based case-control study.  Eligible participants were residents of Carbon, Luzerne, and Schuylkill counties born between 1921–1968 and residing in the area between 2000–2008. Drexel recruited 27  “cases” (i.e., participants diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), including polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF))and 292 “controls” (i.e., participants not diagnosed with MPNs but similar in other characteristics such as age, residence history, etc) through random digit dialing.  Blood samples from participants were analyzed, and odds ratios estimated for a select set of polymorphisms (i.e., variations in a particular DNA sequence).  The researchers selected polymorphisms that are associated with “environmentally sensitive genes.”  The aim of this effort was to try to identify potential classes of environmental exposures that could be linked to the development of genetic changes that could be related to MPNs.

 

For more information:

Visit ATSDR’s web page on PV: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/polycythemia_vera/index.html

Call ATSDR’s toll-free PV information line: 866-448-0242 or email jcx0@cdc.gov, which will connect you to Dr. Elizabeth Irvin-Barnwell, ATSDR Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences.

Contact Lora Siegmann Werner, ATSDR Region 3, by phone at 215-814-3141 or by email at lkw9@cdc.gov.

ATSDR/CDC Northeast PA Polycythemia Vera (PV) Investigation Projects Update

Background

In 2004, using state cancer registry records, the Pennsylvania Department of Health (PADOH) found a PV cluster in northeast Pennsylvania. PV is part of a disease group called myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), which is a group of slow-growing blood cancers where the bone marrow makes too many red blood cells, white blood cells, or platelets.

In 2006, ATSDR was asked to help study PV patterns in the area. From 2007-2008, ATSDR reviewed medical records, conducted genetic testing, and confirmed this PV cluster.

In 2009, Congress funded ATSDR to continue this investigation. ATSDR is overseeing 18 projects with PADOH, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, and various universities and private organizations. These projects are based on recommendations from an expert panel. The panel identified four areas for investigation; epidemiology, genetics, toxicology, and environmental studies.

As of October 1, 2013, all of the contracts for the 18 projects have ended.  The last to end was the tissue bank contract, which closed for recruitment of new tissue donations from the PA tri-county study area in May 2014.  At this time, no new samples will be added from the tri-county study area, but the geographically identified (but de-identified in terms of personal information) donations from the tri-county study area will continue to be available for researchers to access via this national tissue bank established at the Myleloproliferative Disease Research Consortium (MPD-RC).  You can continue to follow the work of the overall MPD-Research Consortium on their website at: http://www.mpd-rc.org/home.php.

Status

The graphic with this email provides this summary as of August 2014.  I’ve attached this graphic both as a “snapshot” in the body of this email, as well as a pdf attachment.  Projects highlighted in “green” in the attached graphic have work complete and a final product available (if applicable).  Projects highlighted in “yellow” have final products in progress and undergoing clearance.  Projects highlighted in “red” have final products that are anticipated but not yet started.

As of August 5, 2014, work is complete and a final product is available (if applicable) for projects.  We are happy to announce that one new project (#16/17, PADEP’s environmental testing) moved from yellow to green since my May update; we now have a factsheet and final ATSDR health consultation report evaluating an initial set of radiological environmental sampling results from the study area.  At the request of ATSDR, PADEP collected and analyzed environmental samples within the tri-county area and ATSDR evaluated the possible health effects of exposure to the radiological elements in the samples.  Environmental samples from the cluster area were collected as a component of the overall research investigation into the PV disease cluster:

  • Indoor air was analyzed for radon.
  • Soil, sediment and water samples were analyzed for metals, organic compounds, and radioactive substances.

This ATSDR public health report focuses on an initial set of the radiological environmental sampling information.  Additional reports evaluating other environmental and health information from the PV investigation will be released at a later date.

The ATSDR report found:

  • Some houses in the study area had elevated levels of radon gas in indoor air. Radon gas was also found in the private well water of some homes.
  • Soils from the study area had slightly elevated levels of radium.
  • Without additional information, ATSDR cannot determine if the cluster of cases of PV disease in the tri-county area is related to the radiological exposures observed in the environmental sampling information.

 

In this report, ATSDR recommends:

  • All residents in the study area should have their homes tested for radon gas. Houses with elevated radon levels should be retested. If a home is retested and elevated radon levels continue, residents should contact the state of Pennsylvania radon program hotline at 1-800-237-2366 and request additional information on how to reduce the radon levels in the home.
  • People in homes with high levels of radon in their drinking water should contact the PADEP Radon Program for assistance. Home water supplies can be treated to reduce radon levels.
  • ATSDR recommends that in those areas where radium in soils seems to be elevated, additional sampling may be helpful to further understand this exposure pathway. ATSDR will discuss the potential for a future collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey to further evaluate levels of radiological contaminants in environmental media in the study area.

 

These documents are available at:

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HAC/pha/PolycythemiaVera/Polycythemia%20Vera%20Investigation%20in%20PA_HC_07-22-2014%20FINAL.pdf

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HAC/pha/PolycythemiaVera/PV%20(Still%20Creek)%20Tri%20County%20-%20FINAL%20Fact%20Sheet%20-%20Review%20of%20Radiological.pdf

Final products for another 9 projects are still in progress and remain coded as yellow.  Final products for 2projects are anticipated but not yet started and remain coded as red.

For more information:

Visit ATSDR’s web page on PV: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/polycythemia_vera/index.html

Call ATSDR’s toll-free PV information line: 866-448-0242 or email jcx0@cdc, which will connect you to Dr. Elizabeth Irvin-Barnwell, ATSDR Division of Toxicology and Human Health Sciences.

Contact Lora Siegmann Werner, ATSDR Region 3, by phone at 215-814-3141 or by email at lkw9@cdc.gov.

 

Other Resources

1. Radiological Testing and Screening – http://www.water-research.net/index.php/radiological-contaminants

2. Radiological – Testing Parameters – http://www.water-research.net/watertest/radiologicalwatertesting.pdf

3. Radon in Water

 

Electronic and Universal Waste Recycling Event Walnutport PA

ELECTRONICS AND UNIVERSAL WASTE RECYCLING EVENT:

ADVANCED GREEN SOLUTIONS INC.
40 3RD STREET WALNNUTPORT, PA.
610-767-2577

Thursday, August 8th at 10-2 pm. There is NO Charge for most electronics dropped of at the site location of the Bowmanstown Borough Garage, 411 Spring Street, Bowmanstown. If you can get it there, thy will unload and recycle it Free of charge. Regular televisions, $10.00 and console/projection TV’s $20.00. Battery and Fluorescent light bulb recycling kits as well as Hard Drive Destruction Certificates are available upon request for a small fee.

FOR MORE INFO CALL – BOWMANSTOWN BOROUGH GARAGE OFFICE at 610-852-2455 or

CARBON BUILDERS 610-379-1099. PASS THIS ON TO FRIENDS.

Volunteer
We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law..  Unsolicited donations are appreciated.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).