Easy Ways to Help Protect Groundwater Quality in Your Community

Here are a few easy ways to help protect Groundwater Quality in Your Community ” Remember We ALL Live Downstream”:

1. Implement Water Conservation Practices and Take the First Step use less and Install a Rain Barrel or Water Garden.

2. Apply fertilizers and other herbicides and pesticides as per the manufacturers specifications or seek out “Green” or Native Alternatives and test the soil before adding fertilizers.

3. Compost  – Do not burn or put leaves or other organic yard waste in plastic bags.

4. Check your Well Water Quality – Get Your Water Tested (Annually) or order a self-screening test.

5. If on a septic system – the septic system should be maintained, cleaned, and inspected approximately once every three years.

6. Run a Community Hazard Report – Know Your H20?

7. Switch to more Eco-Friendly Cleaners.

Use Social Media

1. You do not need to be an advocate – but when you find a good story or information -Like Us,  JUST Share Our Posts, Or Submit a Post – let us know.

2. Like our Facebook Sites

A. Keystone Clean Water Team
B. Know Your H20?
C. Water Research Center

3.  Consider Following Us on Twitter- @KeystoneWater or @KnowYourH2o

3.Share our videos

4. Share Our Educational Booklet

Donation/ Support

1. Send a Donation

2. Recycle Old Cell Phones 

3. Order a “Water Screening Test Kit” as low as $ 1.00 per parameter.

4. Order the “PA Guide to Drinking Water Quality

 

 

JKLM ENERGY, LLC Surfactant Release Potter County Chemical Spill

Initial Press Release (Partial) – Chemical Spill – Potter County, PA   (Please like and share with others)

JKLM ENERGY, LLC INITIATES RESPONSE TO RELEASE OF SURFACTANT AT REESE HOLLOW DRILLING LOCATION IN SWEDEN TOWNSHIP, POTTER COUNTY WEXFORD, Pa (Sept.24) – JKLM Energy, LLC (JKLM) today released information on the company’s ongoing efforts to respond to an incident in which a surfactant solution used in the drilling and completion of natural gas wells is believed to have migrated into shallow subsurface and ground water during initial drilling activities at the Reese Hollow 118 Pad located off Burrows Road in Sweden Township, Potter County, Pa. Surfactants are also referred to as “foaming agents” or “soap.” The migration was discovered following the use of the surfactant to free a broken drill bit piece in the well at 570 feet below ground on September 18th.

“Local residents with questions may contact Dean Boorum, JKLM’s community liaison, at (814) 598-3960. The company is also establishing a website (www.northhollowresponse.com) to provide regular updates as the groundwater investigation and response process continues.”

Link to Information Portal

Link to Press Release

“JKLM ENERGY, LLC TO PROVIDE DAILY UPDATES TO COMMUNITY ON PROJECT WEBSITE No Isopropanol Present in Five of Six Initial Well Water Samples Closest to Drilling Location WEXFORD, Pa (Sept.25) – JKLM Energy, LLC today announced plans to issue daily updates to the public regarding the release of drilling chemicals at its Sweden Township, Potter County wellpad. These updates, along with previous press releases and related information will be available at www.northhollowresponse.com, beginning at 4:00 PM today. As of September 24, 2015 JKLM Energy, LLC received lab results from six water sources that had potential groundwater contamination. These results included four of the five private water wells with foamy characteristics for the presence of isopropanol, the chemical of principal concern in the incident, which was not detected in those four wells. The material was also not detected in a sample collected from a spring located in the area of the investigation. The private well with foam closest to the drill site contained 15 ppm (parts per million) isopropanol, which is at the Act 2 standard for aquifers serving residential uses, the threshold for state drinking water standards. These sampling results are consistent with the belief that the aquifer would continue to disperse and degrade the isopropanol as it is transported through the aquifer by means of normal water flow.”

Local Bradford County News Report
Another News Report 
Another Report

JKLM ENERGY PROJECT UPDATE, OCTOBER 1
Total number of water samples (water wells, springs and surface water sources) analyzed to date (93), and those found with the presence of methylene blue activated substances (MBAS), isopropanol (IPA) and acetone, a constituent that is expected to be found as isopropanol breaks down in the environment. In a correction from yesterday’s update, a total of five samples have been returned with levels of MBAS above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s non-health secondary standard of 0.5 parts per million (ppm).   5 samples above MBAS standard and 1 above isopropanol standard.

Learn More about Foaming Agents in Well Water
Video –Potter County’s water sources contaminated (9/25/2015) – Must Watch – Solid Information.   (53 gallons of chemical used – final concentration or 0.25 % or 2500 mg/L after initial dilution).  (Clarity requested- did it say it moved 8000 feet in 1 day?)

dep-notice-of-violation-jklm-energy (9/30/2015)

Our Comments

Testing Should include general water quality, MBAS, isopropanol, and acetone.  When isopropanol breaks down in the environment, this is a possible daughter.  This would suggest running a full VOC can with TICs to pick up daughters.  Therefore, the equivalent of a Tier II may be advisable.  The breakdown of isopropanol to acetone was based on feedback and expert information from B.F. Environmental Consultants and Quantum Laboratories.

Drinking Water Standard for foaming agents or MBAS – methyl blue activated substances or surfactants is 0.5 mg/L – potential aesthetic problems.
“Methylene blue active substances (MBAS) are anionic surfactants that can be detected by colorometric or color reaction methods. An MBAS assay is a type of analysis that makes use of a substance called methylene blue in order to detect the existence of foaming agents, detergents as well as other anionic substances in water under testing. With the MBAS assay method, undesirable components in water samples can be detected appropriately. This prevents water corrosion or contamination.”

Acetone – Drinking Water Standard – No formal Standard, but there is a clean up standard of 33 mg/L, but New Jersey has a standard of 6 mg/L.    (Also Acetone can be naturally occurring).  If evaluating acetone, it would be advisable to collect preserved and unpreserved samples and analyze samples as soon as possible.  In some cases, the preservation method may create some acetone. 

MSDS Sheet – sec-PROPYL ALCOHOL, ISOPROPANOL, PROPAN-2-OL, IPA – ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL
Another MSDS Sheet (another source)

More MSDS Sheets – F-485 and  Rock Drill Oil 150 (We could not determine the specific one so we are using the “Gulf” as an example)

National Drinking Water Database – Forming Agents

Recommended Baseline Testing – Get The App (FREE)

Informational Course On Fracking and other Energy Courses – The Process

Actions:

  1. If you have any testing done as part of this action, please consider releasing this data to the Citizen Groundwater and Surface Water Database.  Fill out the attached form and mail the data to the following address:
    Mr. Brian Oram, PG
    Keystone Clean Water Team
    15 Hillcrest Drive
    Dallas, PA 18612
    Please note- if you have baseline testing done already you may have some information on the level of surfactants in the water if you had a MBAS test done.
  2. Informational Screening Testing – Get your water screened for water contamination including isopropanol – Informational Screening Water Kit (Not Certified) Covers about 200 parameters, plus a review of any predrilling data – Only $ 275.00.  Email
  3. Drinking Water Guide for Pennsylvania.

 

Water as One Resource Webinar

Critical Issues Webinar:  Water as One Resource

Date/Time:  July 13, 2015; 12:00-1:00pm U.S. Eastern time.

With water shortages gaining prominence as a critical issue in the U.S., many water management authorities are looking at how to more sustainably manage their water. The interconnected nature of water resources means that a change in groundwater can also affect surface water, thus an important component of effective water management is a clear understanding of the linkages between surface and groundwater.  This webinar will provide an overview of how groundwater and surface water interact, what the implications of these interactions on water resources are, and how water can be more effectively managed if an understanding of these interactions is incorporated.

This webinar is co-sponsored by the National Ground Water Association, UW-Extension Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, and Association of American State Geologists

Our speakers include:

  • Ken Bradbury, Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey
  • William M. Alley, National Ground Water Association
  • Thomas Harter, University of California, Davis

To register for this free webinar, please use the link below:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5749766682286339073

More Webinars and Training Courses

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Big Bass Lake Presentation on Well Water Poconos Monroe Wayne County Pennsylvania

Not Regulated - Users Need Help

Not Regulated – Users Need Help – Mission of the Keystone Clean Water Team

The Keystone Clean Water Team was invited to Big Bass Lake to discuss groundwater and private well issues with the Association. Great event and a beautiful community in the Poconos in Gouldsboro, Pennsylvania.  The presenter was board member and manager Mr. Brian Oram from B.F. Environmental Consultants, Inc.  During the presentation, we discussed:

a. Need for private well owners to be proactive.
b. The connection between groundwater and surface water.
c. Private well water testing – common problems and basic solutions.
d. The real hazards in a community may include other private wells.
e. Introduced the Know Your H2O?  Program

Very solid Event.  A Private Well Owner Presentation is available for review.

Supportive Links

Our Educational Booklet on Drinking Water
Know Your H2O? Program
OuR PSAs on Water
Why Should I Test My Well Water?
Mail Order Water Testing Program
Get Your Community Hazard Report for Real Estate Properties (USA Search- Custom Reports).

Most Common Questions

1. How to Shock Disinfect a Well?
2. Where do I get sanitizing tablets?  (Follow link or check with local well drilling contractor)
3. Is radon in water an issue?  Maybe – get more information, but first priority is to get the radon level check and run a long-term radon test.  Radon by zip code (PA).
4. Red water – is the only solution a water softener?
5. My water is great but it turns blue and tastes metallic?
6. My water stinks. What is up?

7. I have a bacteria problem – do i need to install a UV system and spend $ 1500.00.  Maybe- but first you should do the following:
a. Inspect the wellhead or top of the well – Is the casing above grade or below.  If below grade, it would be advisable to hirer a well drilling contract to extend the casing at least 18 inches above grade.
b. Does water sit near the wellhead? – if so – divert the water.
c. Do you have a sanitary well cap?  No sure – this is a sanitary well cap.   Do you have one?  If not install one.
d. Shock disinfect well and distribution system – see link above with video.
e. Retest – you may need to shock disinfect twice.  Example – See Case # 3

Sanitary Well Cap

Sanitary Well Cap

 

Interested in a Community Based Educational Water Testing program for Big Bass Lake – Contact us.

We could use your help – Here is How.

Iron, Manganese, Iron Bacteria, Slime Bacteria - Get Water Tested

Iron, Manganese, Iron Bacteria, Slime Bacteria – Get Water Tested !

Big Bass Lake Community Association is not just another Pocono Mountain Resort. We are an award winning and Gold Star Certified premier Community located in the Pocono Mountains.

Featured Link

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For the New or Future Water Well Owner Homebuyer in Pennsylvania

Welcome to Pennsylvania and Welcome to Managing Your Own Small Water Company

In Pennsylvania,  there are generally no specific construction standards for private wells and there is only some general guidance with respect to well placement and construction.  Further, private well water is not regulated by the EPA or PADEP and therefore it is up to YOU to check your water to ensure that the well produces good clean and adequate water.    This is only a short summary of the information.  If you are interested we offer a Private Well Owner Training Course that can be offered as a Workshop for Your Community, Association, or other Organization.

There are a number of steps to this process and well will break them down as follows:

Well Placement
Well Construction
Well Testing (Yield and Quality)
Well Maintenance
Annual Water Testing

Well Placement
In general, the primary guidance with to water well placement in Pennsylvania is that a water well should be 100 feet from a septic system (regulated), 50 feet from a septic tank (regulated), 10 feet from a sewer line under pressure (regulated), and 10 feet from a property line. To be honest, these isolation distance do not consider impacts from other natural conditions or activities.  In general, we  would recommend the following:

1. If possible, the private well owner should control all activities within a 50 to  100 foot radius of the wellhead, i.e.., top of the water well. These activities should include: use of pesticides and herbicides, storage of toxic or hazardous chemicals, storage or management of manure and other waste, diversion of surface water and runoff, overuse of the area by grazing animals, location of burrow pits, burn pipes, rubbish storage, or storage of used cars or other items that may contain antifreeze, oils, and greases.
2. Well casing should extend at least 12 inches above grade.
3. Well should be fitted with a sanitary well cap that has some form of venting.
4. The well should be located at least 10 feet from a property line.

Other suggested isolation distances

Delineated wetlands or floodplains (25 feet)- with top of casing 3 feet above flood elevation.
Surface waters (25 feet) Storm water Systems (25 feet)
BioInfiltration Stormwater Systems (50 feet +)
Spray Irrigation/ Septage Disposal (100 feet+)
Sinkholes and Closed Depressions (100 feet +)
Farm silos / manure storage (200 feet) Septic Systems (100 feet)
Septic Tanks/Holding Tanks (50 feet)
Chemical Storage/Preparation Area (300 feet)

Well Construction

1. Prefer the use of steel casing that extends at least 15 feet to 20 feet into firm bedrock or 60 feet below ground, whichever is greater.
2. Casing should be of  adequate wall thickness to deal with corrosion and stress – 19lb casing.
3. The base of the casing should contain a driveshoe on the bottom of the casing and casing centralized in the borehole.
4. Wells drilled by a licensed well driller using only potable water as the drilling fluid.
5. Casing should be double circumferential welded or threaded casing
6. Well caps should be sanitary well caps that are properly vented.
7. Annular space should have a grout layer that is at least 1.5 inches thick.
8. Pitless adapters should be used over well pits.

Well Testing (Yield and Quality)

After the well is drilled, the well should be developed using surging, air-lift, or pumping the well.  This is done to clean out the well cuttings and improve yield.  In some cases, this needs to be done to improve the efficiency of the borehole. If the well yield is low, some well drillers will hydrofrac the well. If you are going to hydrofrac a water well, we recommend zone hydraulic fracturing to isolate the deeper potential water-bearing zones.   After the well development has been completed, a shock wellbore disinfection should be conducted.  The well should be allowed to fully recover and a minimum 2-hour yield test is recommend.  After the yield testing, the well should be shock disinfected.  For information on shock disinfection – we recommend visiting Water-Research Center.   The well yield data should include the static water level (water level before pumping), maximum dynamic water level (maximum depth to water during pumping), pumping rate, and length of the pumping test.  This data should be included on the well log and the specific capacity of the well should be reported.  The specific capacity is the rate of yield or gallons per minute per foot of drawdown.  The drawdown is the difference between the static and dynamic water level measurement. 

Before the end of the yield testing, it is recommended that a general water quality analysis of the well be conducted.  This testing should include bacterial quality, general water quality, and specific parameters that are known problems for your region.  Do not rely on a free water analysis or a basic water quality screening down by the well driller.  This should be either information or certified testing conducted by a laboratory.  For information on this type of testing, please contact the Keystone Clean Water Team or the Water-Research Center.   The initial water quality testing data should be reviewed and evaluated.  The first well or city water quality test should be a comprehensive water quality check.  If you are want informational water testing, we would recommend either the Well Water Check or the City Water Check Option. This evaluation should include the need for any further action to improve the well security, continue with well development, or add equipment to improve well water quality.  In some cases, water treatment systems are installed as an additional barrier or layer of protection.  In many cases, the only type of additional treatment that is needed is a whole-house particle filter and a sanitary well cap.  For information on Do-it-Yourself Water Treatment Systems.

Well and System Maintenance

At a minimum, the well water system should go through an annual inspection.  This inspection could be associated with the annual water quality test or inspection of any water treatment systems.  During this evaluation, the aesthetic quality of the water should be evaluated and some basic field water quality screening should be conducted.   For the field water screening, it is possible this can be done using a number of low-cost meters or an informational water quality screening test.

Annual Water Testing

Depending on the results of the initial evaluation, the results should be evaluated to determine what are the water quality parameters that should be monitored to help track the general water quality of the well.  If a water treatment system was installed, the annual water quality evaluation should include the performance of the water treatment system.  If you need help with determining what you need, WE can Help – Here is a partial listing of the informational water screening tests !  The Keystone Clean Water Team can provide guidance on the selection of water quality parameters, review water quality data, and make recommendations on the water quality parameters.  At a minimum, the Keystone Clean Water Team offers a Health Screen Test (only $ 50 if you have the sample bottles (video)) and testing includes bacteria, pH, conductivity, iron, manganese (if suspected), nitrate, total dissolved solids, total hardness, and alkalinity (Health Screen Test Order Form).    If you are interested, you may want to obtain a copy of our Educational Booklet and Brochure.

To Review a Number of our Case Studies – Common Private Well Problems and Fixes.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We have offered “Free” Assistance to this effort, but if you are a private well owner that needs assistance we are happy to help.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.  Follow us on Twitter 

Keystone Clean Water Team is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.    Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission), but we also do local educational workshops and local cellphone/small electronic recycling programs. If you would like to set up a program to help recycle cellphones at an event, business, or other organization.  Through our program we can recycle  cell phones, iPods, game systems, and small digital cameras.  If your interested, please contact us.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).  Keystone Clean Water Team!

Sullivan County Pennsylvania Understanding Your Well Water

UNDERSTANDING YOUR WELL WATER

An evening with Brian Oram, professional geologist and soil & water scientist from B F ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS INC
along with Mr. Ray Martrano lab director from SEEWALD LABORATORIES
Thursday, May 8th, 2014,   6:30 pm for approximately 90 minutes
Lecture and Q&A session to follow
PSU AG CENTER, 9219 Route 487, Dushore Pa

Any homeowner, farmer or industry who has a private water well and wishes to  learn more about the characterisEcs of well water in NE Pa. and how to alleviate  contaminates whether naturally occurring or man influenced. Mr. Oram has  experience in high profile water well issues.  Session is free to the public

Refreshments will be provided
(Please bring your cell phone for the Keystone Clean Water Team – Recycling Program – You may bring along your old cell phones for recycling)

Sullivan County Presentation Groundwater (May 21, 2014)

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving the Program, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.  We look for people that can forward solid articles, help coordinate local education efforts, and more.  Become part of the Keystone Clean Water Team!

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Keystone Clean Water Team is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.    Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission).

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

Free Webinars on Groundwater Education and Related Topics

The Carbon County Groundwater Guardians are providing links to some of the best FREE Webinars on Groundwater Management, Sustainability, Water Well Education and Much More.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law..  Unsolicited donations are appreciated.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

National Protect Your Groundwater Day

Penn State Extension and MWON Promote National Protect Your Groundwater Day—September 10, 2013

protect_dayPenn State Extension and the Master Well Owner Network are excited to announce a variety of educational efforts in recognition of the National Ground Water Association’s Protect Your Groundwater Day on September 10, 2013.

A live webinar will be broadcast from 12:00 to 1:00 PM entitled Strategies to Protect Private Wells and Springs in Pennsylvania to highlight basic management strategies that homeowners can use to protect their drinking water. The webinar will also highlight numerous Penn State publications and web tools that are available to private water well and spring owners. The live webinar can be viewed at

< https://meeting.psu.edu/water1 >

During the evening of September 10, Penn State water resources educators will present a Safe Drinking Water Clinic in Ebensburg, PA for water well and spring owners. This will be the first in a series of Safe Drinking Water Clinics which will be offered around the state in the next 12 months.

 More information about this online course can be found at:

< http://extension.psu.edu/water/mwon >

The Penn State Extension Water Resources team along with Master Well Owners provide education and assistance for thousands of private water well and spring owners across Pennsylvania each year. Tune in on September 10 to learn more about our resources and how to protect your groundwater!

To learn more about the National Ground Water Association and Protect Your Groundwater Day, visit their website at:

< http://www.ngwa.org/Events-Education/groundwater-day/ >

To celebrate National Protect Groundwater Day – The Carbon County Groundwater Guardians will be participating in the PA Energy Games in Hughesville, PA on September 7, 2013. We will have information on private wells, groundwater, alternative energy, conservation and Biomass.  Stop by and Say Hello !

Support the Local Groundwater Education – Get Your Water Tested !

For information about Carbon County’s Groundwater Guardian activities, contact the  Us.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law..  Unsolicited donations are appreciated.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

NGWA Seeks Comment on Draft of Water Well Construction Standard

NGWA Seeks Comment on Draft of Water Well Construction Standard
 it is important to comment – because it is likely that this will be the starting point for a Pennsylvania based standard. 
Public comment on the substantive changes to the draft of the ANSI/NGWA-07-13 Water Well Construction Standard will be accepted through the close of business on August 25.Comments received will be considered in the final water well construction standard to be submitted for approval to ANSI (American National Standards Institute).

A “standard” is a formal technical document for generally accepted processes, procedures, and policies. NGWA is seeking establishment of standards to protect groundwater resources and public health, and to help ensure capable professionals by establishing a benchmark for water well construction.

Part of the ANSI standard development process involves posting any substantive changes for public comment.

The document up for revision only contains the changes that have been made since the last public review.

Among the areas covered by the proposed standard are:

  • Well site selection
  • Casing and casing installation
  • Screens, filter packs, and formation stabilizer
  • Grouting
  • Plumbness and alignment
  • Well development
  • Testing for well performance
  • Data recording
  • Disinfection with chlorine
  • Water sampling
  • Permanent well and test hole decommissioning.

Among those encouraged to comment are stakeholders in the groundwater industry including contractors, regulators, scientists, engineers, suppliers, and manufacturers, as well as consumers such as private and public water well owners.

Interested parties should download the drafted amendments, as well as the comment form located at www.NGWA.org, or contact NGWA Industry Practices Administrator/Certification Coordinator Jessica Rhoads for these documents; comments will only be accepted via the approved form and must be received by e-mail, fax, or postal mail on or before 5 p.m. ET August 25.

For further information, contact Rhoads at jrhoads@ngwa.org or (800) 551-7379 (614-898-7791), ext. 511.

Online Class for Homeowners with Private Wells

The Private Well Class is a free online service, grant-funded to educate homeowners about their private wells.

The Rural Community Assistance Partnership has received a grant from the USEPA to develop a free, online class for homeowners with private wells. We ask that you help promote the class with well owners and those that serve them in your region. If your organization has little contact with private well owners, please feel free to pass this information along to others who might be interested.

The class is set up to be self-help over 10 weeks, with materials emailed once a week to participants. Well owners can sign up anytime, and though the first week was sent on Jan 2, 2013, anyone signing up after that will start as soon as they sign up. So, someone just finding out about this in April can sign up and start the class then. There are three webinars that will provide well owners a chance to reinforce what they are seeing in the class material and ask questions of the presenters. Each webinar will be repeated every three months through August 2013, so no matter when someone starts the class, they will be able to see all three at least once.

Please take a look at the materials attached, visit the website [ http://www.privatewellclass.org/ ] and we encourage you to sign up as a partner. Partners will receive an email when a new webinar date is announced, or when additional information is added to the website. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Cassia Smith
cassiars@illinois.edu
217-333-8700

other
privatewellclass.net

PA Groundwater Online Survey
National Groundwater Issues Online Survey
For Local Case Studies on Groundwater Quality
More Videos on Groundwater Education