Valley View Holds First High School Energy Fair Archbald Pennsylvania

Northeastern Pennsylvania gas companies went to Valley View High School in Lackawanna County to sponsor an energy fair introducing youth to energy careers.

The growth and dedication that has been displayed between the natural gas industry and educational institutions over the years has been staggering. While much of that relationship has been amongst local area colleges, high schools have been becoming closely involved too, as evidenced by the Energy Education Program offered at Valley View High School in Archbald.”

As this blog has noted before, the Energy Education Program offered by Valley View is the first of its kind in the state, as it brings energy-specific curriculum to the high school level and was developed as a collaboration between industry experts and school officials. The course covers nine different types of energy and regularly features speakers from the various industries.

But on Friday, Dec. 18, Valley View took the next big step in its program and hosted its first Energy Fair, which was planned and organized by the Energy Education Program class.

Read More about the Event and Program

We were planning to go to the event, but the presenter became ill.  Prior to the event, we did conduct training and educational course on energy conservation and Geothermal Energy.

Presentation on Sustainability Training (pdf)
Our Presentation on Careers in Energy – The Great Earth Engine (pdf)

More training Opportunities in Energy and the Environment

 How you can help the Keystone Clean Water Team ! Trying to encourage a positive change in Pennsylvania.

ATSDR Initial Study Finds Elevated Levels of Radon Gas, Radium in Polycythemia Vera Study Area in Pennsylvania

ATLANTA (7/2014)—Some homes in Carbon, Luzerne, and Schuylkill counties of Pennsylvania have elevated levels of radon gas in indoor air and radium in soils, according to a health consultation released today by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). Researchers were unable to determine if a cluster of cases of Polycythemia Vera (PV) in people living in the counties is related to exposures to the substances.

The report provides an analysis of radiologic sampling information researchers reviewed to learn more about the possible cluster of PV cases in northeastern Pennsylvania. PV is a rare form of cancer of the blood that causes the body to make too many red blood cells. It occurs more often in men than women, and is rare in patients under age 40.

“Based on analysis of the samples, ATSDR considers the exposures to radon gas in indoor air at these homes to be of public health concern and encourages residents living in the study area to have their homes tested,” said Lora Werner, Director, ATSDR Region III. “The elevated levels of radium in soils are not considered to be a health risk but may be worthy of further study.”

At the request of ATSDR, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) collected and analyzed environmental samples within the tri-county area and ATSDR evaluated the possible health effects of exposure to the radiological elements in the samples.

The ATSDR report also found:

  • Some houses in the study area had elevated levels of radon gas in indoor air. Radon gas was also found in the private well water of some homes.
  • Soils from the study area had slightly elevated levels of radium.
  • Without additional information, ATSDR cannot determine if the cluster of cases of PV disease in the tri-county area is related to the radiological exposures observed in the environmental sampling information.

This report is part of a larger investigation of the cluster of cases of PV in northeast Pennsylvania. Overall, there are 18 projects in four areas for investigation: epidemiology, genetics, toxicology, and environmental analysis. The findings of these projects will provide information about PV and other blood disorders, as well as share information on environmental investigations in the study area.

ATSDR recommends:

  • All residents in the study area should have their homes tested for radon gas. Houses with elevated radon levels should be retested. If a home is retested and elevated radon levels continue, residents should contact the state of Pennsylvania radon program hotline at 1-800-237-2366 and request additional information on how to reduce the radon levels in the home.
  • People in homes with high levels of radon in their drinking water should contact the PADEP Radon Program for assistance. Home water supplies can be treated to reduce radon levels.

The health consultation report on radon gas and radium in the PV study area is available at:www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/polycythemia_vera.

For more information, please call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636). Please request information about: “Review of Radiological Data Measured in the Polycythemia Vera Investigation Study Area in Carbon, Luzerne, and Schuylkill Counties.

Our Radon Portal – Links to Air and Water Testing -Outside of Study Area –http://www.water-research.net/index.php/radon

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ATSDR, a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, evaluates the potential for adverse human health effects of exposure to hazardous substances in the environment.

Marcellus Shale Appalachian Basin Unique View

Natural gas production from the Marcellus shale formation in the increased to 14.4 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in January 2015, accounting for more than 36% of shale gas production and more than 18% of total dry natural gas production in the United States, according to EIA’s Natural Gas Weekly Update. Recent updates to EIA’s maps and geologic information for the Marcellus shale play help to characterize the formation’s structure, thickness, and extent. EIA uses well data to construct maps showing the formation extent and structure of the productive and prospectively productive regions of the Marcellus. Structure and thickness maps are key elements in resource estimation and in defining the areas where hydrocarbon extraction is economical. Maps showing the top and bottom of the formation as 3-D surfaces can be used for a rough estimation of subsurface volumes, as well as detection of regional structural and tectonic features such as major faults, folds, and thrusts.   Post provided for educational purposes.

 

Depth to the  Formation

Depth to the Formation

 

3D Diagram of the Basin

3D Diagram of the Basin

 

Thickness of the Marcellus Shale

Thickness of the Marcellus Shale

Sources:

http://www.oilvoice.com/n/Updated-geologic-maps-provide-greater-detail-for-Marcellus-formation/38a70524ca6b.aspx
Principal Contributors: Olga Popova, Evan Frye, Elizabeth Panarelli (Oil Voice) 4/1/15

“The Ben Franklin Shale Gas Innovation and Commercialization Center (www.sgicc.org) is designed to harness innovation and new technologies to maximize the economic return to Pennsylvania’s citizens from the Marcellus and Utica shale formations. The Center’s goal is to increase sustainable employment and wealth creation in Pennsylvania that has the potential to outlast the initial exploration, production and transportation of natural gas from the formations. The Center will also identify, support and commercialize technologies and early-stage businesses that enhance responsible stewardship of the environment while properly utilizing this transformative energy asset.”

Learn More About Natural Gas Development, Fracking, Fracking Terms, and Sustainability

Everything we do began with an idea.

We have offered “Free” Assistance to this effort, but if you are a private well owner that needs assistance we are happy to help.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. KCWT’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to KCWT’s About Page or contact us.  Follow us on Twitter 

Keystone Clean Water Team is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.    Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission), but we also do local educational workshops and local cellphone/small electronic recycling programs. If you would like to set up a program to help recycle cellphones at an event, business, or other organization.  Through our program we can recycle  cell phones, iPods, game systems, and small digital cameras.  If your interested, please contact us.  Our new PSAs.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).  Keystone Clean Water Team!

Alternative and Renewable Energy Energy Options for Pennsylvania

The Academy is a S.T.E.M. (science, technology, engineering, and math) magnet school in the Hazleton Area School District. The academy offers a variety of learning opportunities in the sciences, including onsite college courses at reduced tuition rates, project-based learning, individual and group work, and many creative ways for students to demonstrate their knowledge.    Mr. Brian Oram of the Keystone Clean Water Team and the owner of B.F. Environmental Consultants Inc. conducted an education outreach effort as part of Earth Day.
During the presentation on April 22, 2014, Mr. Oram focused on:

The Importance of Conservation and Energy Efficiency
Need for the Use of Renewable Energy Where it Works Best
Need for State-wide Use Of Biomass and Groundsource Heating and Cooling
Regional/ National Wind and Solar Projects
Role of Nuclear Energy and
The Role of Fossil Fuels (Coal, Natural Gas, and Oil).

We learned that if we just recycle cellphones we could save the energy equivalent to 18,500 houses per year.

The presentation was fact based and highlighted the need for a State and National Energy Policy over a “Carbon” Plan.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.  We look for people that can forward solid articles, help coordinate local education efforts, and more.  Become part of the Keystone Clean Water Team!.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Waiting on Official Name change to the Keystone Clean Water Team by the IRS.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

 

 

Community Connections to Our Watershed – Marcellus Shale

Community Connections to Our Watershed –  Pennsylvania DCNR Program

The program brings “Real world experiences bridge the gap between classroom “knowing” and community “doing””. PA Land Choices has been developed to provide participants with a basic understanding of community government and the powerful role of citizens who work toward common goals. The engaging activities in the manual provide opportunities to work collectively in teams, gaining knowledge and skills that will be useful for a lifetime. Workshops involve professional planners and other experts to help participants create, sustain and protect the special character or their neighborhoods. It is a lesson on citizenship and the democratic process practiced at one of the most important levels…right in your home town.

The Keystone Clean Water Team (that is correct) – The name change is official with the IRS– was happy to assist this program with an education and outreach program related to energy use, types of energy sources, need for a national energy policy and community approach, and the facts about Marcellus Shale Development.  We talked about baseline testing, pre-existing problems, how wells can be impacted, how to understand and manage risk and much more – All Fact Based.   After the education program, the students toured a natural gas drilling site.  The tour guide was Mr. Bill Desrosier from Cabot Oil and Gas.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.  We look for people that can forward solid articles, help coordinate local education efforts, and more.  Become part of the Keystone Clean Water Team!.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Waiting on Official Name change to the Keystone Clean Water Team by the IRS.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission).

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

Wellness and Water 2013 WV Wesleyan College, Buckhannon,WV

Wellness and Water 2013

June 29 – 30, 3013 ~ WV Wesleyan College, Buckhannon,WV

 

Saturday Morning: Bringing concerned citizens and facts together

8:00 – 9:00 am ~ Registration ~ Continental Breakfast, Coffee & Tea available

9:00- 9:15 am ~ Welcome and Introductions

9:15 – 10:00 am ~ Plenary: Dr. Tom Darrah, Duke University

10:00 – 10:20 am ~ Q & A

For More Information

10:20 – 10:30 am ~ Break

10:30 – 11:30 am ~ Panelists:

  • Marc Glass, Downstream Strategies
  • Rob Goodwin, Coal River Mountain Watch
  • Yuri Gorby, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (NY)
  • Brian Oram, B.F. Environmental Consultants and the Carbon County
    Groundwater Educators

Each panelist will have 10-15 minutes for an initial presentation of their work related to monitoring impacts of MTR and gas drilling. Q & A will follow entire panel presentations, until noon.

 noon – 1pm ~ Lunch

****************************************************************************

Saturday Afternoon: To whom does all this matter?

1 – 1:15 pm ~ Gathering time

Please be in your seats by 1:15 pm. Announcements may be made between 1 and 1:15 pm.

1:15 – 2:00 pm ~ Plenary: Leslie Fields, Sierra Club
2:00 – 2:15 pm ~ Q & A

2:15 – 3:15 pm ~ Affected Resident Panelists:
Coal mining affected:

  • Nada White, Boone and Kanawha counties, WV
  • Danny Cook, Boone County, WV
  • Lorelei Scarbro, Raleigh County, WV

Gas drilling affected:

  • Leann Kiner, Harrison County, WV
  • Donna Herd, Doddridge County, WV
  • Jeanne Moten, Washington County, PA

3:15 – 3:30 pm ~ Q & A

3:30 – 3:45 pm ~ Break and workshop set-up

3:45 – 5:15 pm ~ Workshops:

  • Rob Goodwin, Coal River Mountain Watch ~ Mapping of slurry impoundments and coal mine sites
  • Elisa Young ~ Problems of waste disposal and water extraction affecting the Ohio River
  • Brian Oram, B.F. Environmental Consultants ~ “Working as a Community – We ALL Live Downstream” on the need for proper baseline testing and the most likely types of influence or adverse impacts associated with natural gas development
  • New Visions Solar ~ Solar powered water filtration system and “homemade” solar power

5:30 pm ~ Dinner

Saturday Evening: Music & Socializing – Main Meeting Room, Student Center

7 pm – ??? ~ Featuring music by East Run (Bluegrass band)

****************************************************************************

Sunday Morning: What can we do about the problems created by extreme fossil fuel extraction in our region?

 8:00 – 9:00 am ~ Registration ~ Continental Breakfast, Coffee & Tea available

9:00 – 9:15 am ~ Welcome and Announcements

9:15 – 10:00 am ~ Plenary: Grant Smith, Civil Society Institute

10:00 – 10:15 am ~ Q & A

10:15 – 11:15 am ~ Solution Focused Panelists:

  • Pam O’Brien, New Visions Solar, Solar power and solar powered water filtration devices
  • Sam Malone, FracTracker: Exploring data, sharing perspectives, mapping impacts of the gas industry
  • Aaron Sutch, Energy Program Manager for the Mountain Institute
  • Laura Rigell, Swathmore College Divestment Campaign

Each panelist will have 10-15 minutes for an initial presentation of their work. Q & A will follow entire panel presentations, until 11:30 am.

11:30 – 11:40 am ~ Break

11:40 am – 12:30 pm ~ Roundtable Discussions (facilitated by Bill Price, Sierra Club)

12:30 – 12:45 pm ~ Wrap Up & Evaluations

12:45 – 1:45 pm ~ Lunch

For More Information

If you are in Pennsylvania, you can contribute to the Citizen Groundwater Database and help track change for FREE and if you would like to learn about our Natural Gas Related Information, please visit us at http://www.private-well-owner.org

Volunteer
We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.

Marcellus Shale Coalition Guiding Principles Document

Pittsburgh, PA – The Marcellus Shale Coalition (MSC) published Recommended Practices (RP) for Water Pipelines, the sixth in a series of guidance documents aimed at further enhancing the safe development of natural gas across the Appalachian basin. This RP for constructing water pipelines is in line with the MSC’s Guiding Principles to “implement state-of-the-art environmental protection across our operations” and supports ongoing industry efforts to reduce its operational overall footprint.

“By continually implementing cutting-edge recycling technologies, water pipelines and other innovative water management practices, our industry is able to further reduce the volume of truck traffic and capitalize on environmental benefits inherent to safe development and use of natural gas,” said MSC chief executive officer Kathryn Klaber. “As Marcellus Shale development advances, and more operators build water pipeline networks to support their well operations, this guidance document will aid in the siting and construction process. Additionally, this RP builds upon a series of content-rich, member-driven guidance documents designed to raise the bar and advance our industry’s commitment to operational excellence and compliance.”

This Recommended Practice for Water Pipelines was drafted by industry professionals and provides guidance to the industry in the following areas:

Optimal Route Selection: Identify sensitive resources and minimize environmental impact.

Pipe Materials: Determine correct materials and utilize proper resources to construct pipelines.

Valves: Install appropriate valves to isolate segments of the line; allow for maintenance; and permit drainage.

Pipeline Restraints: Use restraints to prevent unwanted line movement.

Operational Considerations: Test pipelines to avoid leaks, consider any environmental consequences, monitor all lines and air venting during operations, and consider using locks, handles, protective covering, or drainage when necessary.

Deactivation: Upon completion the pipeline should be deactivated or removed in its entirety after all remaining water is removed.

Continued Klaber, “With water and water management serving a critical role in the well completion process, ensuring that water pipelines, both temporary and permanent, are constructed to the highest degree of integrity is critical for the development process, the environment and public safety.”

To view other Recommended Practices click HERE
MSC Guidance on Stray Gas

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The above is not my work – but provided as a link to information.

More on
Well Water Quality In Pennsylvania
Barium, Arsenic, Lithium, Methane
Common Well Water Problems – Helpguide
Case Studies
New Educational Tool on Drinking Water Quality

Website Provided for Educational Purpose.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.

 Carbon County Groundwater Guardians on Facebook

The Baseline Water Testing Process It is NOT Just About Getting a Sample

The Baseline Water Testing Process It is NOT Just About Getting a Sample
By Brian Oram, Professional Geologist
Carbon County Groundwater Guardians
Published in March ONG Marketplace

We have had the opportunity to witness a wide range of practices that have been called baseline testing. We have seen a team of 4 professionals working for the EPA in Dimock, Pennsylvania, take 4 to 5 hours to collect one water sample and we’ve seen a single sampler with virtually no training take 15 minutes to purge and sample a private well with no field measurements or even gloves. The potentially negative impacts of this wide variation in sampling techniques and experience is compounded by the lack of field documentation and a quest for that “single” list of parameters. This approach will make for great future lawsuits and media stories, but does little to generate the reliable data required by professionals, scientists, regulatory agencies, and the public.
The key elements to effective baseline testing should include:
a. A selection of parameters and indicators that meets the regional environmental conditions and addresses the historic and proposed activities and practices in the region and not just a simple list provided or recommended by a regulatory agency;
b. chain-of-custody practices with internal and external quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) that start and end with the certified laboratory working with a trained third-party professional;
c. field documentation, including notes, field measurements, and photos, that includes a summary of the existing condition of the private water distribution system;
d. field sampling done by third-party samplers that are either licensed professionals or specifically trained in the standard operating procedures of the certified testing laboratory, plus these individuals must have a working understanding of common water treatment systems; and
e. prior to releasing the data, the certified laboratory must validate and review the data, plus work with the third-party professional to confirm or check the reliability and validity of the results.
As part of our outreach efforts, we have been able to review baseline testing conducted by multiple entities. Here is just one example for your consideration.
The sample was collected by a non-professional, third party sampler, tested by a certified testing laboratory, and then given by a natural gas company to a private well owner. The sample was collected only a few weeks before drilling started. The well owner was given a report with the raw data, spike and recovery analysis, surrogate testing results, field data sheet, and a full listing of the methods and the laboratory certifications. When the homeowner, a royalty owner, asked if there was any problems, we provided them a list.
1. The field conductivity was reported at 250 uS/cm, but the certified laboratory data had reported a total dissolved solids of 1500 mg/L;
2. The cation and anion mass balance was out of balance by over 25 %;
3. Total metal values less than dissolved metal values; and
4. The well had arsenic at over 10 times the primary drinking water standard, but this was never flagged as a problem for the private well owner.
This data is not scientifically valid and does not make sense. It may be certified, but it is wrong and there is no time to collect another pre-drill sample.
As professionals, we have the obligation to attempt to get it right and to properly inform citizens when a problem is identified. It is critical that we implement a process to screen the water quality data before it is distributed to the community. To build trust, the data must be provided to the private well owner in a format they can understand.
Baseline testing can be a valuable tool for the environmental professional, gas drilling industry, and community. With proper planning, baseline testing can used to determine where additional documentation or monitoring is needed and to determine the location of systems or wells vulnerable to influence.

In our opinion, baseline testing is not just part of an environmental audit, but in many ways, it is an opportunity for the company and consultant to build trust in the community. At the same time, the company is attempting to mitigate risk by documenting pre-existing conditions, the data collected during this baseline assessment should be used to make critical decisions related to the use of best management practices and build trust in the community through education and outreach. 

Baseline testing is a community issue. We ALL live downstream and we need to solve problems as a community. This is a great opportunity to make a positive difference in your host community.  Options for informational well water testing.

Support Groundwater Education in Pennsylvania and Consider Scheduling an Education Workshop for Your Community – just email bfenviro@ptd.net

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  

 Carbon County Groundwater Guardians on Facebook

PENN STATE LAUNCHES WATER-TESTING PROGRAM FOR PA. RESIDENTS

Carbon County Groundwater Guardian Water Testing and Education Program started in 2000.   We also started conducting well owner workshops in 1999 and were part of the Master Well Owner Program.

Penn State Ag Sciences News 7/24/2007
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — To help ensure an abundant supply of safe
water for people, crops and livestock, Penn State’s College of
Agricultural Sciences has launched a water-testing program, which will
be administered by the college’s Agricultural Analytical Services
Laboratory.

“About 3.5 million rural Pennsylvanians rely on more than one
million private wells for their drinking water, and about 20,000 new
wells are drilled each year,” says Bryan Swistock, water resources
senior extension associate. “We hope by encouraging people to get their
water tested, we can help them to improve their water quality and to
safeguard their health.”

Swistock points out that private water supplies in Pennsylvania are
not regulated by the state or federal government, and well owners are
responsible for maintaining the quality of their own water. “However,
about half of the state’s wells that have been tested fail to meet at
least one drinking-water standard,” he says.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established primary
and secondary drinking-water standards. Primary standards apply to
contaminants — such as coliform bacteria, nitrate and lead — that
cause health problems. Secondary standards address iron, manganese,
chloride and other pollutants that cause aesthetic problems, such as
stains, odors or off-tastes. Penn State’s program will provide well
owners with reports detailing how their water-test results compare to
these EPA standards.

Similar testing will be done for water used for livestock
consumption. “When dairy and livestock producers are trying to diagnose
performance problems with their animals, water is one nutrient that
often is overlooked,” says Virginia Ishler, nutrient-management
specialist in dairy and animal science.

“It’s not uncommon for aesthetic problems, such as odors and
tastes, to cause water intake in cattle to drop, which in turn can
reduce milk production,” Ishler says. “Less frequently, bacterial
contamination can adversely affect animal health. Offering this testing
program will give us a chance to help producers diagnose and correct
problems that might be limiting productivity and profitability.”

Two testing programs for irrigation water — for
greenhouses/nurseries and for turf — will be offered. The
greenhouse/nursery testing protocols will focus primarily on nutrient
content, according to Rob Berghage, associate professor of horticulture.
“Water quality and fertility are critical to greenhouse and nursery
operators,” he says. “Managing nutrient content is especially important
for growers using recirculating systems. Too much or too little
nutrients can harm plant health.”

Berghage explains that contamination issues also can be a concern,
particularly in “beneficial re-use” systems where water is being
recycled from sewage or industrial plants. In addition, he says, knowing
what’s in irrigation water can help growers manage nutrients and
chemicals in run-off, minimizing their environmental impact and helping
to enhance water quality in streams, rivers and the Chesapeake Bay.

To submit a water sample for testing, customers first must obtain a
free water-test kit from Penn State’s Ag Analytical Services Lab or from
a participating county office of Penn State Cooperative Extension. The
kit includes shipping materials, instructions on how to take a sample
and a submission form. Residents will choose from a range of testing
options available for each water type (drinking, irrigation or
livestock) and will send the kit, with the appropriate fee, to the lab.
Test results and relevant fact sheets or recommendations typically will
be returned in two to three weeks.

For more information, contact your county Penn State Cooperative
Extension office (find it on the Web at
http://www.extension.psu.edu/extmap.html) or the Ag Analytical Services
Lab (814-863-0841, aaslab@psu.edu), or visit the lab’s Web site at
http://www.aasl.psu.edu.

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Support Groundwater Education in Pennsylvania and Consider Scheduling an Education Workshop for Your Community – just email bfenviro@ptd.net

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  

 Carbon County Groundwater Guardians on Facebook