Supporting Solid Organizations in the Wyoming Valley – Buy a Poinsettia – Kingston Rotary

We always try to help the community, Kingston Rotary is holding a poinsettia sale. There biggest project to date just happened this year, and that is the Forty Fort Park Pavilion. If you are driving down Wyoming Avenue take a look at this structure and the picnic tables etc, that are there. This project cost over $ 50,000, and is completely paid for through grants and our fundraising such as this.  Another major project they did over 25 years ago, was the Church Street Park in Kingston. This park was turned over to the borough and is still in use today.  They also support many Non profits such as Candy’s Place and WVCA, see Poinsetta order form flyer 2017 and other historic projects in area.

We need to replenish our treasury so we can continue to do these projects. These poinsettias are beautiful plants, and are grown by a local grower  (BUY LOCAL) , so not only are you helping Rotary you are helping a local business. They make a beautiful holiday decoration for your office.  You can email your orders, or just print out the sheet and fax or hand to me then next few weeks,  As in the past if you order 10 plants or more I will deliver to your place of business.

 

Details Contact:

Edward W. Stanks Jr., C.P.A.
458 Wyoming Avenue
Kingston, Pa. 18704
Phone: 570-288-9990
Fax: 570-288-2553

Job VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT Executive Director, Pike County Conservation District, Pike County, Pennsylvania

VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PIKE COUNTY CONSERVATION DISTRICT

Pike County Conservation District (PCCD) is accepting applications for a full-time Executive Director (ED). Challenging position responsible for management of the overall administration and supervision of Conservation District programs, personnel, and operations implementing the Conservation District Mission within Pike County. Must be a leader, a service-oriented individual with high ethical standards and excellent interpersonal, communication and organizational skills. Must have a knowledge of current natural resource conservation issues, practices and programs. ED supervises a staff of 7. Pike County position with a competitive salary and benefit package. Pike County is an EOE. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Bachelor’s degree in natural resource management, environmental science or related field with demonstrated experience of at least two (2) years (including supervisory experience), or any equivalent combination of experience. Must possess and maintain a valid Pennsylvania driver’s license. Clear Pennsylvania State Police criminal background check, all Child Abuse History Clearances and FBI fingerprint clearance are required. Applicants must submit: 1) Letter of Interest addressed to Conservation District Selection Committee and 2) A Detailed Resume including references. Send to ATTENTION OF: Selection Committee, Pike County Conservation District, 556 Route 402, Hawley, PA 18428. Must be received by PCCD no later than January 5, 2018 closing date for applications. Hard copy submissions preferred. Email submissions send only to scorrigan@pikepa.org. Please read minimum qualifications thoroughly and demonstrate you meet requirements in the materials you submit.

THANK YOU
Sally Corrigan, Executive Director
Pike County Conservation District
scorrigan@pikepa.org
570-226-8220 (t) Ext. 1338
www.pikeconservation.org

Training Courses

Professional Management Courses including Project and Non-profit Management

Water Resource Training Courses – Wetlands, Smart Development, Sustainability, Stream Restoration, and More.

Susquehanna River Basin Commission – Water Withdraws – Fact Sheet Registration.

The Susquehanna River Basin Commission (Commission) is contacting you because you may have clients who are affected by a new program for registration of unapproved water withdrawals and consumptive water uses in the Basin.  We are seeking your assistance to help ensure that facility managers are aware of and complete registration by the deadline of December 31, 2019.

An initial contact letter and registration factsheet (GFregistration-grandfathered-water-withdraws-factsheet) was sent to more than 1,300 facilities by direct mail this week. The targeted grandfathered facilities/sources are those where water withdrawals or consumptive uses equal or exceed the regulatory thresholds, but began operating before the applicable regulations became effective. These water withdrawals and uses are generally considered to be exempt from obtaining a Commission docket, provided there has been no environmental harm and no changes are made at the facility.

The Commission has initiated the registration effort after reviewing the results of our Cumulative Water Use and Availability Study that highlighted major gaps in the data the Commission needs in order to effectively manage the water resources of the Basin.  We estimated that there are possibly more than 700 older, unpermitted facilities with an estimated water use of nearly one billion gallons per day. If accurate, this volume of water use is roughly equal to the total amount currently accounted for, and managed, by the Commission across the entire Basin.

Informational webinars explaining the registration program will be conducted by Commission staff on November 14 and December 13, 2017. To register for a webinar, visit www.srbc.net/grandfathering-registration.

If you need additional information or assistance, visit the website or contact Commission staff at GFregistration@srbc.net.

Thank you,

Susquehanna River Basin Commission

Radon occurrence in groundwater from 16 geologic units in Pennsylvania

Evaluation of radon occurrence in groundwater from 16 geologic units in Pennsylvania, 1986–2015, with application to potential radon exposure from groundwater and indoor air
Scientific Investigations Report 2017-5018

“Results from 1,041 groundwater samples collected during 1986‒2015 from 16 geologic units in Pennsylvania, associated with 25 or more groundwater samples with concentrations of radon-222, were evaluated in an effort to identify variations in radon-222 activities or concentrations and to classify potential radon-222 exposure from groundwater and indoor air. Radon-222 is hereafter referred to as “radon.” Radon concentrations in groundwater greater than or equal to the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) for public-water supply systems of 300 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) were present in about 87 percent of the water samples, whereas concentrations greater than or equal to the proposed alternative MCL (AMCL) for public water-supply systems of 4,000 pCi/L were present in 14 percent. The highest radon concentrations were measured in groundwater from the schists, gneisses, and quartzites of the Piedmont Physiographic Province.

In this study, conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Health and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, groundwater samples were aggregated among 16 geologic units in Pennsylvania to identify units with high median radon concentrations in groundwater. Graphical plots and statistical tests were used to determine variations in radon concentrations in groundwater and indoor air. Median radon concentrations in groundwater samples and median radon concentrations in indoor air samples within the 16 geologic units were classified according to proposed and recommended regulatory limits to explore potential radon exposure from groundwater and indoor air. All of the geologic units, except for the Allegheny (Pa) and Glenshaw (Pcg) Formations in the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province, had median radon concentrations greater than the proposed EPA MCL of 300 pCi/L, and the Peters Creek Schist (Xpc), which is in the Piedmont Physiographic Province, had a median radon concentration greater than the EPA proposed AMCL of 4,000 pCi/L. Median concentrations of radon in groundwater and indoor air were determined to differ significantly among the geologic units (Kruskal-Wallis test, significance probability, p<0.001), and Tukey’s test indicated that radon concentrations in groundwater and indoor air in the Peters Creek Schist (Xpc) were significantly higher than those in the other units. Also, the Peters Creek Schist (Xpc) was determined to be the area with highest potential of radon exposure from groundwater and indoor air and one of two units with the highest percentage of population assumed to be using domestic self-supplied water (81 percent), which puts the population at greater potential of exposure to radon from groundwater.

Potential radon exposure determined from classification of geologic units by median radon concentrations in groundwater and indoor air according to proposed and recommended regulatory limits is useful for drawing general conclusions about the presence, variation, and potential radon exposure in specific geologic units, but the associated data and maps have limitations. The aggregated indoor air radon data have spatial accuracy limitations owing to imprecision of geo-coded test locations. In addition, the associated data describing geologic units and the public water supplier’s service areas have spatial and interpretation accuracy limitations. As a result, data and maps associated with this report are not recommended for use in predicting individual concentrations at specific sites nor for use as a decision-making tool for property owners to decide whether to test for radon concentrations at specific locations. Instead, the data and maps are meant to promote awareness regarding potential radon exposure in Pennsylvania and to point out data gaps that exist throughout the State.”

Link to Study 

Pennsylvania Ticks – Yes they are a problem

 

Pennsylvania has led the nation in  confirmed Lyme disease cases each year since 2011.   When detected early, Lyme disease and other tick borne diseases can be   treated. Left untreated, tick borne   diseases can cause a whole host of problems. Early diagnosis is important in  preventing long term complications.

After coming inside, always check yourself for ticks. The target areas, head and hair, armpits, back of knees, and waist line/middle of the body,  are prime spots to find a tick as they seek out out-of-the-way crevices and warm spaces. Look closely, they are  smaller than a freckle.

If a tick does manage to attach itself   to you, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the  tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.
Pull upward with steady,  even pressure. Avoid twisting  or jerking. Clean the bite area and see a physician.   If possible – Save the Tick!

TickBrochure_FINAL

More about Lyme Disease and Ticks

Pike County Pennsylvania – Conservation Events for April 2017

Conservation Events in April 2017

The month of April is filled with environmentally themed events. Below is a list of events. Be sure to visit the Events Calendar at www.pikeconservation.org or like Pike County Conservation District on Facebook to be sure you are kept up to date.

April 8- Pike Wayne Trout Unlimited Banquet: Reservations required; contact John Hochreither: 570-352-8303 or by email: john.hochreither@pwtu.org.

April 9- Pike Wayne Trout Unlimited River Clean-up: Visit www.pwtu.org/ for more information.

April 17- Pike County Conservation District Roadside Clean-Up: Contact Michele Long at mlong@pikepa.org or by phone 570-226-8220.

April 21-23- Hawley EarthFest: Contact Rebecca Holler at rholler@pikepa.org or by phone 570-226-8220 or visit www.hawleyearthfest.com/.

April 23-30- Conservation District Week: Contact Pike County Conservation District 570-226-8220 or follow us on Facebook to see the various events during the week.

April 27- Pike/Wayne Envirothon: Contact Rebecca Holler at rholler@pikepa.org or by phone 570-226-8220.

April 29- Pocono Environmental Education Center Earth Day: Visit www.peec.org/ for more information.

Professional Forest Industry Association, ProFIA “Fuel for Friends – Looking for Families

The Professional Forest Industry Association, ProFIA, is once again looking for recommendations for their annual program, “Fuel for Friends”. As the cold days are increasing in number, those that are struggling financially have a difficult time staying warm. Through this program, ProFIA donates a free cord of firewood to a family in need. If you know of a family who is finding it difficult to afford heat this winter please contact me so I can forward their information to ProFIA for consideration. We will be meeting tonight.

Kind Regards,

Kelley

Kelley S. Thornton
Forest Specialist

Wayne Conservation District
648 Park Street
Honesdale, PA 18431

Phone: 570.253.0930 ext. 3954
Email: kthornton@waynecountypa.gov

Department of Environmental Protection’s Office of Oil and Gas Management Chapter 78

The Department of Environmental Protection’s Office of Oil and Gas Management has scheduled the first in a series of question-and-answer sessions regarding the implementation of Chapter 78a. The webinar will be held on December 6 at 1:00 p.m. DEP staff will be taking written questions and providing as many answers during the webinar as possible, however some questions may require additional discussion and will be answered at a later time. All written questions will receive a written answer that will be posted to the Oil and Gas Program’s FAQ website. In order to make the webinar as productive as possible, DEP asks that written questions be provided to Scott Perry at scperry@pa.gov by Tuesday, November 29. These questions will be prioritized at the webinar.

Participants may join the webinar up to 20 minutes prior to the meeting. Participants will want to make sure that they allow time to get the webinar setup on their computers. For audio, participants must use an available telephone line. They can choose to call the toll-free number attached or they can choose to have Webex call them by providing the telephone number they wish to use.

Event link: https://copa.webex.com/copa/onstage/g.php?MTID=e3af2c72988aaceabb90a847fcebece64
Date and time: Tuesday, December 6, 2016, 1:00 p.m.
Duration: 2 hours
Event number: 646 830 722
Event password: OOGM_1
Audio conference: 650-479-3208
Access code: 646 830 722
If you have questions or difficulties, please contact
Katherine Hetherington Cunfer, DEP External Affairs Director, at
717-705-2693 or khethering@pa.gov.

PASPGP-5 Training Marcellus Shale Coalition General Permit 5 Stream and Wetlands Encroachments

PASPGP-5 Training
Wednesday, July 27, 2016
4.5 Professional Development Hours (PDH) available!

The Marcellus Shale Coalition is pleased to offer to all oil and gas industry stakeholders the opportunity to attend a training session on the recently released Pennsylvania State Programmatic General Permit 5 (PASPGP-5).

Section 404(e) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) (33 U.S.C. §1344) provides for the issuance of Department of the Army (DA) general permits (GP) on a statewide basis, which operate in conjunction with a State regulatory program that protects the aquatic environment in a manner equivalent to the DA regulatory program, provided that the activities permitted under each category of such GPs are similar in nature and result in no more than minimal individual or cumulative adverse effects on the aquatic environment.

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Dam Safety and Waterway Management Rules and Regulations establish a statewide permit program for protecting the waters of the Commonwealth. The Commonwealth’s procedures for the granting of permits require the PA DEP to apply evaluation criteria consisting of alternatives analysis (for non-water dependent activities), avoidance techniques, the minimization of impacts, and if a permit is to be granted, compensatory mitigation. The evaluative criteria within the Commonwealth’s program are similar to Federal criteria under Section 404(b)(1) of the Federal Clean Water Act.

The PASPGP-5, effective on July 1, 2016, authorizes impacts to stream and wetland encroachments and crossings in Pennsylvania. During this training, attendees will be educated on the requirements within PASPGP-5. Additionally, an update on the proposed wetland and stream assessment protocols that were released for public comment in 2014 and are approaching finalization will be discussed. Lastly, industry experts will present case studies that will demonstrate five methods for pipeline stream crossings and review lessons learned.
To download the training flier, click here.
PRESENTERS
Adam D. Beck, P.E.
General Manager – Gathering Construction, CONSOL Energy
Colonel Edward P. Chamberlayne
Commander, Baltimore District, USACE
Wade Chandler
Chief, Pennsylvania Section, Baltimore District, USACE
Sid Freyermuth
Bureau of Waterways Engineering and Wetlands, PA DEP
Dave Goerman Jr.
Water Program Specialist, Bureau of Waterways Engineering and Wetlands, PA DEP
Ramez Ziadeh, P.E.
Director, Bureau of Waterways Engineering and Wetlands, PA DEP

Other online training programs (CEUs and PDHs) and Resources for Professionals.

Environmental Health Product – Tri-Heat Heating Pad

Since I am getting Older – I came across this product seems interesting at our local BNI Business Meeting – Where I was speaking about the Know Your H20 Program and it is part of our BUY Local and Support Local Business Efforts.

heating pad with controller

Tri-Heat is a new style heating pad that was designed to help people with muscle, joint and arthritic pain find a more comfortable and effective way of applying heat therapy.Heat application is a commonly prescribed therapy in today’s medical field and Tri-Heat’s unique design makes it perfect for treating pain in hard to target areas such as the neck, wrist, shoulder, elbow and knee, among others. 

Traditional heating pads are flat, flimsy and offer no support. When you try to wrap them around the injury you have to struggle to hold them in place and fit them to your joints. When you constantly have to readjust them you lose the heat and therefore any benefit they offer.

Tri-Heat is different. When you place it in the area that needs treatment you don’t have to adjust it or struggle to make it fit into the muscle and joint because the design allows it to comfortably stay in place and heat effectively. It’s great for Arthritis sufferers, as well as athletes looking to warm up their leg, arm, and shoulder muscles before a big game.

Tri-Heat comes with:

  • 4 Heat Settings
  • Moist Heat Capability
  • Two Heated Sides
  • 40 Min. Auto Off

Tri-Heat Brochure 1

Forty Fort, PA 18704 Email: contact@triheating.com 844-Tri-Heat or 844-874-4328

Think Healthy, Eat Healthy, Safe Community, Drink Clean Water, and Make a Difference !

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