Getting Well Water Tested Carbon County Pennsylvania

The Carbon County Environmental Education Center, in conjunction with the Keystone Clean Water Team, is offering a low-cost well-water testing opportunity for area residents.

Test kits are available now for pick-up at CCEEC. Homeowners may collect water samples, then return them on Sunday, April 19, from 1:00 to 3:00 pm, where Environmental Consultant and Hydrogeologist Brian Oram will perform certain tests immediately. Other results will be mailed confidentially within two weeks.

Two testing options are available: a $50 test includes total coliform, pH, iron, and other parameters, and a more comprehensive test is available for $95.

Homeowners with private wells are encouraged to test their water at least once each year, and area residents whose property might be impacted by any future development should consider testing to establish a baseline of well water quality.

For more information on this program, call CCEEC at (570) 645-8597. The Center is located at the west end of Mauch Chunk Lake Park, just outside Jim Thorpe, at 151 E. White Bear Drive in Summit Hill.

The program is underwritten by the Organizations Sponsors – Your Company or Business Can Sponsor- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJPOkLpWQo4

or Become an Individual Supporter – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbOXE7HS7PE

 

 

 

Pennsylvania New Guideline for Baseline Testing – Minimum Parameters Natural Gas Development- Pre-Drill

In April 2014, the PADEP released a new list of suggested baseline testing parameters.   PADEP recommended Basic Oil and Gas- Pre-Drill Parameters. The new listing is as follows:

Strongly Recommended

Alkalinity
Chloride
pH
Total Dissolved Solids
Turbidity
Barium
Calcium
Iron
Manganese
Sodium
Methane
Ethane
Propane

Suggested Additions by PADEP

Conductivity
Hardness
Bromide
Sulfate
Total Suspended Solids
Magnesium
Potassium
Strontium
Arsenic
Zinc
Aluminum
Lithium
Selenium
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons – West PA strong Recommendation.

Get a copy of the PADEP Document.

Our comments

1. We are glad to see that PADEP is updating the list of parameters, but there are still a few parameters that are missing.  If possible, we would suggest that you speak with a professional and evaluate the need to add BTEX or the 21 – regulated/unregulated VOCs with MTBE, surfactants, and if you currently have low pH and a corrosion related issue – copper and lead.
2. If the well is deep and does have issues with chloride or Total dissolved solids approaching a drinking water standard , we would recommend testing for alpha/beta and uranium.
3. If you have a radon in air mitigation system, we recommend testing radon in water.
4. If you have sulfur or rotten egg odors, we would recommend standard plate count, nuisance bacteria, documentation of the odor and characteristics of the water, and testing for sulfide.
5. If you have a septic system or you are located near a farm, we would strongly recommend adding nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia.
6. The pH, conductivity, temperature, and ORP should be documented in the field and the pH and conductivity should be checked in the laboratory.  In addition, it would be advisable to measure the turbidity in the field.  If laboratory testing is going to be conducted a shorter holding time should be used and the sample measured ASAP.  In addition, the sample collector should not the appearance, color, odor, or other aesthetic quality of the water.

More Information on the Groundwater Quality in PA and Baseline Testing

We also offer educational workshops on this topic and help provide citizens evaluate their water quality.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving the Keystone Clean Water Team (CCGG Program), enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.  We look for people that can forward solid articles, help coordinate local education efforts, and more.  Become part of the Keystone Clean Water Team!.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !   Get educated on Drinking Water Quality in Pennsylvania.

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Keystone Clean Water Team /Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  The IRS Officially Approved Name change to the Keystone Clean Water Team by the IRS.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission).

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

 

Penn State surveys roadside springs

blog.pennlive.com/pa-sportsman/2014/01/penn_state_surveys_roadside_springs_grouse_meeting_and_more_outdoor_insider.html

By Marcus Schneck | mschneck@pennlive.com
January 05, 2014

Nearly all of the 35 roadside springs across Pennsylvania – all heavily used for drinking water supplies – checked by researchers in a Penn State Extension survey failed at least one drinking water standard. Roadside springs are a common source of drinking water in Pennsylvania, but little is known about the quality of the water. Penn State Water Resources Extension Educators Jim Clark and Diane Oleson surveyed the springs to determine the drinking water. The 35 roadside springs included in the survey were mostly located within PennDOT road rights-of-ways in 19 counties. Water samples were collected by seven Penn State Water Resources Extension Educators between April and August of 2013. Each sample was analyzed for 20 common inorganic and microbiological water quality parameters by the Agricultural Analytical Services Laboratory at Penn State.

Overall, 97 percent of the roadside springs failed at least one drinking water standard. The most common health-related pollutants were coliform bacteria (91 percent), E. coli bacteria (34 percent) and lead (3 percent). Other common pollutants that could cause various tastes or other aesthetic issues included corrosive water (89 percent), low pH (40 percent), sediment (31 percent), iron (6 percent) and manganese (6 percent). Several pollutants were not found in any of the springs in excessive concentrations including aluminum, nitrate, arsenic, barium, copper and chloride. Clark and Oleson suggest that these results should provide caution for anyone currently collecting and drinking water from a roadside spring.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

HB 343 ESTABLISH STATEWIDE PRIVATE WATER WELL CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS (former HB 1855)

The bill authorizes the Environmental Quality Board to establish water well construction standards through the adoption of rules and regulations of the DEP that are generally consistent with the National Groundwater Association construction standards.

Specifically, the legislation would establish construction standards, including the decommissioning of abandoned wells, to be followed by water well drillers and owners.  Nothing in this legislation requires the metering of homeowner wells.

p. Ron Miller (R-York) serves as Majority Chair of the Committee and Rep. Greg Vitali (D-Delaware) serves as Minority Chair.

Original Article

Website Provided for Educational Purpose.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.

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