Sullivan County Pennsylvania Understanding Your Well Water

UNDERSTANDING YOUR WELL WATER

An evening with Brian Oram, professional geologist and soil & water scientist from B F ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS INC
along with Mr. Ray Martrano lab director from SEEWALD LABORATORIES
Thursday, May 8th, 2014,   6:30 pm for approximately 90 minutes
Lecture and Q&A session to follow
PSU AG CENTER, 9219 Route 487, Dushore Pa

Any homeowner, farmer or industry who has a private water well and wishes to  learn more about the characterisEcs of well water in NE Pa. and how to alleviate  contaminates whether naturally occurring or man influenced. Mr. Oram has  experience in high profile water well issues.  Session is free to the public

Refreshments will be provided
(Please bring your cell phone for the Keystone Clean Water Team – Recycling Program – You may bring along your old cell phones for recycling)

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving the Program, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.  We look for people that can forward solid articles, help coordinate local education efforts, and more.  Become part of the Keystone Clean Water Team!

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Keystone Clean Water Team is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.    Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission).

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

Harveys Lake Private Well Owner Groundwater Monitoring Event

Water Well Tests and Q&A Session Offered

A comprehensive package of drinking water tests will be offered once again this summer at a deeply discounted price to Harveys Lake residents by the Harveys Lake EAC, Mr. Brian Oram, and the Keystone Clean Water Team.

You don’t have to live next to a superfund site to have problems.  Besides concerns related to agriculture, mining, land development, spills, and natural gas development, nature put many dangerous substances into the ground and we can add to it by what our neighbors and we do in our own backyards.  A few facts about PA Groundwater and Private Wells:

1. About 30 to 50% of private wells have an elevated level of total coliform.
2. About 15 to 20% of private wells have e. coli.
3. About 6 to 8 % have elevated levels of arsenic.
4. About 20 to 30% have elevated levels of iron.
5. About 10 to 20 % have elevated levels of managanese.
6. About 5 % have elevated levels of chloride, barium, strontium, total dissolved solids, radiological issues, and/or methane (above 7 mg/L).

Source: Citizens Groundwater and Surfacewater Database (Oram, 2012)

The tests will be conducted on Saturday morning, July 12 by Brian Oram, a professional geologist and water well expert who has run the testing programs here at Harveys Lake for many years.  The cost of this year’s water well test package will remain at $95 (compared to a retail value of more than $225).  Residents’ water will be tested for Alkalinity (Total as CaCO3), Chloride, Fluoride, Hardness, Nitrate as N, Orthophosphate, pH (Standard Units), Sulfate, Total Dissolved Solids, Turbidity (Turbidity Units), Total Coliform with e. coli check, Aluminum, Arsenic, Barium, Cadmium, Calcium, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Lead, Magnesium, Manganese, Mercury, Nickel, Potassium, Selenium, Silica, Silver, Sodium and Zinc  (We are trying to add Uranium and Strontium to this testing package)

Interested residents should register with Denise, at 570- 639-1042.  Participants can pick up water sampling kits at the Harveys Lake Borough Building beginning June 30.  Water samples must be dropped off between 10am and noon on July 12 at the Borough Building’s meeting room, where scientists will perform certain tests immediately.  Confidential final test results will be mailed to participants directly from the Water Research Center  and the Keystone Clean Water within two weeks of the testing date.  Payment in full for the testing is due on July 12.

Important Note: This program’s test results do not meet the requirements of a legal baseline water well test.  However, these tests remain a valuable and cost-effective opportunity for homeowners to monitor the safety of their drinking water.  Residents can learn more about legal baseline testing and find competitive pricing at http://harveyslakepa.us/eac/well_testing.htm.  If you need help with baseline testing, please contact our staff for more information or visit our laboratory listing page.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.  We look for people that can forward solid articles, help coordinate local education efforts, and more.  Become part of the Keystone Clean Water Team!.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Waiting on Official Name change to the Keystone Clean Water Team by the IRS.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission).

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

Cellphone Recycling Program Raise Money for Groundwater Education in Pennsylvania

Save Water, Energy, and Help the Keystone Clean Water Team and the Environment – Announcing OUR Cell Phone Recycling Program

Electronic products are made from valuable resources and materials, including metals, plastics, and glass, all of which require energy to mine and manufacture. Donating or recycling consumer electronics conserves our natural resources and avoids air and water pollution, as well as greenhouse gas emissions that are caused by manufacturing virgin materials.  For every million cell phones we recycle, 35 thousand pounds of copper, 772 pounds of silver, 75 pounds of gold, and 33 pounds of palladium can be recovered.

The Problem –  Because of their small size and rapid replacement cycle, cell phones are more likely to end up in the waste stream and contribute a growing portion of the toxic materials that end up in our landfills.

“There are over 260 million cell phone users (85% of the population) in the U.S. alone with nearly 1 Billion currently in retirement. It has been estimated that only 10% of unwanted cell phones are recycled each year.

Health and environment

Cell phones and their accessories contain a large number of hazardous substances known as Persistent, Bioaccumulative and Toxic Chemicals (PBTs). Included in the list of PBTs are metals (e.g. antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, copper and lead) which can linger in the environment for a long time and have adverse effects on human health.

Recycling cell phones reduces greenhouse gas emissions, keeps valuable material out of landfills and incinerators, and conserves natural resources. Recycling just a million cell phones reduces greenhouse gas emissions equal to taking 33 cars off the road for a year.

Endangered animals

An ore called Coltan is a source of the element tantalum which is an essential coating for components of cell phones. This ore is often found in the Congo in the middle of endangered gorilla and elephant habitats. These animals are being killed by rebel bands mining this ore. The U.N. has reported that in the past five years, the eastern lowland gorilla population in the Congo has declined 90%. Reducing the demand for Coltan will help save these animals and their habitat.

The solution

Make a difference starting now!

Recycling cell phones helps the environment by saving energy and keeping useable and valuable materials out of landfills and incinerators. It also helps preserve important animal habitats by reducing the demand for Coltan. In addition to recycling cell phones and electronic waste it is critical that consumers demand conflict free electronic devices.   You can help the Keystone Clean Water Team and the Environment by recycling your cell phone.  ”

If you would like to set up a program to help recycle cellphones at an event, business, or other organization.  Through our program we can recycle  cell phones, iPods, game systems, and small digital cameras.  If your interested, please contact us.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving the Program, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.  We look for people that can forward solid articles, help coordinate local education efforts, and more.  Become part of the Keystone Clean Water Team!

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Keystone Clean Water Team is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.    Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission).

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

 

Community Connections to Our Watershed – Marcellus Shale

Community Connections to Our Watershed -  Pennsylvania DCNR Program

The program brings “Real world experiences bridge the gap between classroom “knowing” and community “doing””. PA Land Choices has been developed to provide participants with a basic understanding of community government and the powerful role of citizens who work toward common goals. The engaging activities in the manual provide opportunities to work collectively in teams, gaining knowledge and skills that will be useful for a lifetime. Workshops involve professional planners and other experts to help participants create, sustain and protect the special character or their neighborhoods. It is a lesson on citizenship and the democratic process practiced at one of the most important levels…right in your home town.

The Keystone Clean Water Team (that is correct) – The name change is official with the IRS- was happy to assist this program with an education and outreach program related to energy use, types of energy sources, need for a national energy policy and community approach, and the facts about Marcellus Shale Development.  We talked about baseline testing, pre-existing problems, how wells can be impacted, how to understand and manage risk and much more – All Fact Based.   After the education program, the students toured a natural gas drilling site.  The tour guide was Mr. Bill Desrosier from Cabot Oil and Gas.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.  We look for people that can forward solid articles, help coordinate local education efforts, and more.  Become part of the Keystone Clean Water Team!.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Waiting on Official Name change to the Keystone Clean Water Team by the IRS.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission).

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

House Bill 1565 House Committee on Environmental Resources and Energy Hearing January 29, 2014 Thomas Reilly

House Committee on Environmental Resources and Energy Hearing January 29, 2014 -
Testimony by Mr. Thomas J. Reilly, Jr., P.E., President of Reilly Associates Engineering.

My name is Tom Reilly. I want to thank you for this opportunity to present my views on the
proposed legislation. I am a professional engineer licensed in Pennsylvania and New York and
President of Reilly Associates Engineering located in Pittston and Stroudsburg. Our practice is
focused on Civil and Environmental Engineering for public and private infrastructure projects
and land development. Our firm was founded by my grandfather over 80 years ago. During the
30 years since I began my engineering career I have been an active practitioner in the application
of new regulations instituted to improve and protect water quality. I have always been
fascinated with civil engineering as a career for two reasons. First, each project is a unique
challenge because each every site has a different characteristics and warrants a customized
solution. Second because there is the opportunity to benefit many people with a good solution
whether they are the users of the project themselves or those downstream. I also love
Pennsylvania because of the beauty and diversity of the landscapes from rural to urban and the
variety of waters from small brooks and ponds to large rivers and lakes.

I support the proposed House Bill No. 1565 because we can both protect streams and develop
projects by applying appropriate best management practices on a site specific basis. I believe in
a holistic approach where the topography, soils, flora and fauna, water resources, property rights
and transportation and utility infrastructure are evaluated in the context of the project program
and a plan developed using green infrastructure techniques. There are a wide range of
management practices that may be applied to achieve the anti-degradation requirement of the
clean water act that depend on the project setting and development goals. Riparian buffers
should be part of a mix of planning and design elements with its width adjusted based on the
specific site situation including the nature of the water resource. Measures such as bioretention,
water gardens, pervious pave, green roofs and cisterns coupled with minimization of parking
areas can work with various widths of riparian area to achieve the required level of treatment and
protection.

Waters which currently require riparian buffers include ditches a few feet wide which are
designated ‘intermittent streams” and small ponds where the 150 ft. buffers on each side of the
water combine to total 300 ft. and often result in substantial portions of large tracts being
rendered unbuildable. In most of these cases the anti-degradation requirements could have been
met with a number of different BMPs tailored to the site situation. There are also numerous
special protection waters in urban and suburban settings where the existing pattern of
development is entirely within the 150 ft. area and the existing smaller riparian border is well
established by historic neighboring development. While the regulations allow for a waiver
procedure with review by DEP, this requirement and process is akin to a local zoning board
establishing new building setbacks that are three times the existing setback on small existing lots
with the result that any new building could not go forward without seeking a variance.

The benefits of riparian buffers include the establishment and preservation of greenways along
stream corridors for enhancement of wildlife habitat and community recreation as well as water
quality protection and improved neighborhood property values. Each of these community

benefits are most ably pursued in balance with property owner interests through local and
regional planning, zoning and stormwater regulations. Water quality can be protected to meet
Clean Water Act requirements with a site specific management plan. Many local codes already
include stream setbacks in the range of 25 ft. to 75 ft. and floodplain management ordinances
where variances can be addressed where appropriate at a local level.

My work includes project development in New York State in areas of similar topography across
the border from Northeast Pennsylvania. The New York State application of NPDES
stormwater requirements of the clean water act includes buffers as optional best management
practices where buffers can be coupled with other site design approaches and structural BMPs to
achieve the water quality, volume and rate goals.

Keeping the parts of Pennsylvania with extensive HQ and EV waters economically competitive
and keeping the waters clean will require using a more holistic approach that incorporates a more
flexible approach to NPDES permitting.

I support the proposed HB 1565.

Protect Your Own Drinking Water in Pike County the Poconos

Pike County Commissioners and the Pocono Source Water Protection Collaborative

“Protect Your Own Drinking Water”
Saturday March 22, 2014 9:00 am – Noon
Pike County Training Center, Route 739, Lords Valley

We invite you to join us at an important free forum called, Protect your Own Drinking Water: Our Most Important Resource.  The forum will be held on Saturday, March 22, 2014, from 9 a.m. until noon at the Pike County Training Center, located on Route 739, in Lords Valley.  The forum will help promote understanding of Pocono drinking water areas, the threats we face, effective stewardship measures, and ways that local officials and homeowners can take action to prevent contamination before it’s too late.  Everyone has an important role to play in protecting our vital liquid assets.  To register, contact the Pike County Conservation District at 570-226-8220.  For more information about the Pocono Source Water Protection Collaborative and the forum, visit www.sourcewaterpa.org/pocono.   Funding for the Collaborative and forum has been provided by the League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania Citizen Education Fund under a grant from the PA DEP for Drinking Water Source Water Protection, administered by the US EPA.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.  We look for people that can forward solid articles, help coordinate local education efforts, and more.  Become part of the Keystone Clean Water Team!.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Waiting on Official Name change to the Keystone Clean Water Team by the IRS.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

Pennsylvania Well Owners Residents Submit Data to the Citizens Database

For 2014 – ROA Number – 2  - Citizens Database

For the past 20+ years, Mr. Brian Oram has been conducting water quality analysis, baseline testing, and conducting education programs for the citizens of Pennsylvania.  Even though our groundwater resources are one of our most important assets, there is limited data on the quality and quantity of regional groundwater. While working at Wilkes University, he helped establish the formation of a “Citizen” Groundwater and Surfacewater Database.  Even though he no longer work full-time at Wilkes University, he is working with the Keystone Clean Water Team,   Dr. Brian Redmond,  and Dr. Sid Halsor on the development, formation, and creation of this community tool.  This regional  water quality database is an unbiased warehouse of water quality data that is supported by fellow “Citizens” of this Commonwealth.   After reviewing this information, we would hope you will take action and support the PA Citizens Groundwater and Surfacewater Database and Contribute to the PA Private Well Owner and Watershed Survey, but if you outside of Pennsylvania we will still provide assistance with reviewing your data and maintain a record.  For private well owners and water systems outside of Pennsylvania, please participate in this survey.

The database will provide information about the current state of groundwater and surface water quality and serve as a basis for monitoring impacts related to Marcellus gas drilling and other activity in our region.  The purpose of our database is twofold. We will use it to help us better understand the current and future groundwater and surface water quality for the region. The database will also be used to generate educational materials relating to regional water quality. The database is for research and education purposes, and will not be sold or used for any commercial purpose. The database is managed by representatives of the Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences Department at Wilkes University, i.e., Dr. Brian Redmond and Dr. Sid Halsor.  To protect your privacy, the research database file will only include the testing results, zip code, general information on well or water source, and the latitude and longitude of the sampling site. Your name, address, or other contact information will NOT be included within the database.

To learn More – go to Citizen Science and the Citizen Groundwater/ Surfacewater Database- The Concept

You can send a copy of your certified testing data- It is FREE!

In order to participate in this process, please do the following:

1. Information Document about the Program (Download a copy – fill it out -Please Keep for Your Reference).
2. Download a copy of the Consent Form to release to the Database and Sign and Return.
3. Send a copy of your certified laboratory testing results with Chain-of-Custody Documents.
4. Mail this information to:

Mr. Brian Oram, PG
Keystone Clean Water Team
15 Hillcrest Drive
Dallas, PA 18612
Questions  – call (570) 335-1947
or send a pdf version by email to bfenviro@ptd.net.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.  We look for people that can forward solid articles, help coordinate local education efforts, and more.  Become part of the Keystone Clean Water Team!.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Waiting on Official Name change to the Keystone Clean Water Team by the IRS.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

Shalefield Stories: Frontlines of Fracking Tell their Story to the Country

Shalefield Stories: Residents on the Frontlines of Fracking Tell their story to the country

Philadelphia, PA — A newly released booklet, compiled by the citizen’s group Friends of the Harmed, is being released nationwide to make the case why fracking should not be expanded into other states.  The booklet, called Shalefield Stories, which PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center is helping to present, recounts stories of families living with illness, water contamination and damage to their livelihood—even as the current administration advocates to carry-on, full steam ahead, with fracking.

“Behind the alarming numbers that outline fracking’s environmental impacts, there are real people whose lives have been gravely impacted by these polluting practices,” said Kristen Cevoli, Fracking Program Director for PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center. “These are their stories, and it is our responsibility to heed their words of warning on fracking.”

People recalling their experiences with fracking damage in Shalefield Stories include:

  • Judy Armstrong Stiles of Bradford County, Pa., who spoke of the barium and arsenic that was found in her drinking water, and then in her blood, after Chesapeake began drilling on her land;
  • June Chappel of Washington County, Pa., who lived with a 15 million gallon fracking waste pit just 200 feet from her house; and
  • Terry Greenwood of Washington County PA, who lost 11 head of cattle after fracking fluid contaminated a pond and field on his farm.

Shalefield Stories was compiled by individual residents in Pennsylvania and is being released in a number of events across the country to highlight the tragedies that have impacted people in Pennsylvania, Colorado, Ohio, Texas, and West Virginia from growing amounts of shale gas drilling.

“The natural gas industry has stolen our land, polluted our streams and air, made our family and animals ill, and destroyed our peaceful way of life,” said David and Linda Headley, residents of Fayette County, PA in the report. “We want safer extraction, more concern for the environment, and accountability for the industry.”

One of the common themes running through Shalefield Stories is how people have become sick living on the frontlines of fracking.  In Bradford County, PA, shortly after drilling began in 2010, the Stiles family experienced a series of unexplained health problems, from extreme rashes that caused their skin to peel, stomach aches, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and seizures.    An independent water test revealed dangerous levels of lead, methane, barium, arsenic, and other toxic chemicals in family’s tap water. Blood tests revealed barium and arsenic. Further testing revealed radon in the air, and radium and uranium in the water.

The toxic substances used in fracking fluid and wastewater have been linked to a variety of negative and serious health effects, such as cancer, endocrine disruption, and neurological and immune system problems.

“The only transparent part of this industry is the toxic contamination that it’s doing to our environment and to our democracy” stated Briget Shields of Friends of the Harmed, “This one of the reasons we put Shalefield Stories together – to expose what these drilling companies are doing to our families and communities.”

PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center presented Shalefield Stories today, as further mounting evidence of the dangerous and dirty practice of fracking in the state of Pennsylvania.

“For anyone across the nation who doubts the damage of dirty drilling, all they have to do is look to the nightmare unfolding in Pennsylvania. We have known this truth for some time. But now we are hearing it from the source, from the very people living on the frontlines of fracking,” concluded Cevoli. “We urge our decision-makers in Harrisburg to heed the warnings of their own constituents who have had to live with the consequences of dirty drilling, and take swift action to close the door on this dangerous practice.”

On the federal level, last summer the Obama administration received more than a million comments urging for much stronger protections from fracking for national forests and national parks. In addition, Rep. Matt Cartwright (PA) has introduced CLEANER (H.R. 2825) — a bill to close the loophole exempting oil and gas waste from the nation’s hazardous waste law.

Reference/Comment- Characteristics of Wastes  (I do agree that the states should be regulating under the Solid Waste Regulations- PA does due this already)!

“What experiences like these show is that states are not protecting people from this dirty drilling,” said Cevoli, of PennEnvironment. “It’s time for Washington to step in; ultimately they need to ban fracking in order to protect our environment and public health. They can start by barring fracking in and around our national parks and national forests, and closing the loopholes that exempts fracking from core provisions of our nation’s bedrock environmental and public health laws.”

For more information- Because of the size of the document (18 mb) and the unclear copyright provisions (18 mb) is appears the document may be available fro free from Penn Environmental.

Personal Comments

1. I think it is a document that must be reviewed, please obtain a copy, review, and fact check.
2. I wish the authors provided more historic detail where predrilling testing was actually present and available.  Many of the problems or unknowns created by the lack of proper baseline testing.  A little more fact checking would have been nice.
3. I wish the authors went a little deeper that just listing cases, but did the follow through and remove claims that were later to be determined not to be related to natural gas development.  This makes the larger document suspect and takes away from the individuals that had an impact from spill or disturbance during the drilling problem.
4.Again -the document does that same as all the other posts – takes about the stuff that was found in the water, but really does not go into the details on pre-drilling levels, post-drilling levels, and what the levels really mean.  Please see the Well by Well Analysis for Dimock,PA.
5. We have been working on groundwater and private well issues for a long time, it is not just about the documented presence, but the concentration and other information is critical.
6. PA residents can submit their data to the Citizens Database (It is Free!)
7. Impacts to private well and groundwater is NOT an issue that should be used as part of environmental spin.  There are real problems that require real solutions.  Many citizens need to understand what happened, how to fix, and how to protect their interest.

Please Note Our Free Well and Spring Testing Program - Program is open to all private well owners in the United States.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

Free Well and Spring Water Screening Test

As part of our outreach and assistance to private well owners, we are offering a free water screening test.  The water screening test will check the general quality of your well or spring water and the testing will include pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, iron, nitrate, nitrite, alkalinity, and total hardness.  To qualify for the testing, you will need to do the following:

1. Provide you full name, email address,  and mailing address with a general description of your water source. This should include your zip code, county, and local municipality and the water sample should be collected prior to any water treatment.
2. Provide a description of any water quality concerns or questions.
3. Provide a copy of any certified baseline testing or most recent water test.
4. Using a clean plastic spring water bottle or plastic container – collected a 200 ml water sample or 6 ozs- Remove any aeration devices and allow the water to run for 10 to 15 minutes prior to sampling.  Ship the sample to the address shown below.
5. State that you Liked our Websites on Facebook (PA Groundwater Forum and/or Carbon County Groundwater Guardians).

Mail your water sample to the following address.  Turn-around time may be as much as 2 weeks.

Keystone Clean Water Team(CCGG Program)
15 Hillcrest Drive
Dallas, PA 18612

There will be no charge for the analysis, but we will plan to use your testing results as part of our educational outreach program.   There will be NO sales calls for water treatment equipment and your contact information will NOT be sold to any third party.

If you are looking for more comprehensive information water testing, please visit our Private Well Owner Water Testing Portal.   If you are looking for certified baseline testing, please go to this webportal.

This program is supported by donations by individuals, businesses, and corporations. Please consider supporting this effort – ever dollars helps!

Program is open to all private well owners in the United States.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).

Penn State surveys roadside springs

blog.pennlive.com/pa-sportsman/2014/01/penn_state_surveys_roadside_springs_grouse_meeting_and_more_outdoor_insider.html

By Marcus Schneck | mschneck@pennlive.com
January 05, 2014

Nearly all of the 35 roadside springs across Pennsylvania – all heavily used for drinking water supplies – checked by researchers in a Penn State Extension survey failed at least one drinking water standard. Roadside springs are a common source of drinking water in Pennsylvania, but little is known about the quality of the water. Penn State Water Resources Extension Educators Jim Clark and Diane Oleson surveyed the springs to determine the drinking water. The 35 roadside springs included in the survey were mostly located within PennDOT road rights-of-ways in 19 counties. Water samples were collected by seven Penn State Water Resources Extension Educators between April and August of 2013. Each sample was analyzed for 20 common inorganic and microbiological water quality parameters by the Agricultural Analytical Services Laboratory at Penn State.

Overall, 97 percent of the roadside springs failed at least one drinking water standard. The most common health-related pollutants were coliform bacteria (91 percent), E. coli bacteria (34 percent) and lead (3 percent). Other common pollutants that could cause various tastes or other aesthetic issues included corrosive water (89 percent), low pH (40 percent), sediment (31 percent), iron (6 percent) and manganese (6 percent). Several pollutants were not found in any of the springs in excessive concentrations including aluminum, nitrate, arsenic, barium, copper and chloride. Clark and Oleson suggest that these results should provide caution for anyone currently collecting and drinking water from a roadside spring.

Volunteer

We seek new people at all skill levels for a variety of programs. One thing that everyone can do is attend meetings to share ideas on improving CCGG, enabling us to better understand and address the concerns of well owners.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.

Carbon County Groundwater Guardians is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Unsolicited donations are appreciated.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).