5th Annual 2016 Shale Gas Innovation Contest Launched Ben Franklin

5th Annual 2016 Shale Gas Innovation Contest Launched by Ben Franklin Shale Gas Innovation and Commercialization Center!

 STATE COLLEGE, PAThe Ben Franklin Shale Gas Innovation and Commercialization Center www.sgicc.org is announcing today their 5th Annual Shale Gas Innovation Contest, offering a total of $80,000 in cash prizes for the four best shale energy oriented innovations, new product ideas, or service concepts that are either in the development stage or recently launched.  Researchers, entrepreneurs, or small businesses in Pennsylvania or West Virginia focused on developing a new product or service for the shale energy space can apply.  A simple online application can be found at http://www.sgicc.org/2016-shale-gas-innovation-contest.html.

The SGICC also wants to recognize the generous support of the Benedum Foundation that once again extends the contest to include West Virginia, as well as Pennsylvania.

In addition to the cash prizes, successful applicants will gain exposure to investors, potential partners, and industry sponsors. Additionally at this year’s Finals Event, already scheduled to take place on May 18th, 2016 at the Hilton Garden Inn in Southpointe, PA, there will be a poster session included to highlight some of the most promising technologies under development at regional universities and research centers.

This 5th Annual Shale Gas Innovation Contest’s GOLD Sponsor is the Ben Franklin Technology Partners (http://www.benfranklin.org). Industry sponsors include: AquaTech (www.aquatech.com), Chevron Technology Ventures (http://www.chevron.com/ctv/ctvi/), EQT Corporation (https://www.eqt.com/ ), First National Bank (www.fnb-online.com ), GE Oil & Gas (http://www.ge-energy.com), Inflection Energy (http://www.inflectionenergy.com/),  LPR Energy (http://www.lprenergy.com/), LPR Land Services (http://www.lprls.com/), the Marcellus Shale Coalition (http://marcelluscoalition.org), PPG Industries (http://corporate.ppg.com/), Praxair (www.praxair.com), Steptoe & Johnson PLLC (http://www.steptoe-johnson.com/ ), and Williams (www.williamsinthenortheast.com). Non-Profit sponsors include: Carnegie Mellon University Scott Institute for Energy Innovation (http://www.cmu.edu/energy/), and Penn State University’s Institute for Natural Gas Research (http://www.ems.psu.edu/INGaR).

Bill Hall, Director of the SGICC commented, “The challenging pricing environment that the industry is facing, coupled with the ever increasing emphasis on environmental compliance, and gaining the social license to operate across the Marcellus and Utica Shale Region continues to make new innovations all the more important. The rapid pace of innovation adoption across the shale energy plays in this region has been amazing! Through the contest SGICC shines a light on the best new innovations being developed in our region.”

Entering the competition is easy, requiring the completion of the online application. Any idea or already commercialized product or service related to the shale energy space is eligible. Examples include well pad EH&S products or services, novel materials or chemicals to enhance performance, or for instance prevent corrosion or improve product yield, remote site monitoring technologies, natural gas or NGL conversion technologies, and water management or remediation technologies.

Finalists will be chosen by a panel of industry experts. To download an application, visit www.sgicc.org and click on the 2016 Shale Gas Innovation Contest tab.  Deadline to enter is 11:59PM on February 1st, 2016.

For details regarding eligibility or other questions, contact Bill Hall at either 814-933-8203 or billhall@psu.edu.

New Tools and Courses

Know Your H20 Phone App and Database Search
Citizen Scientists – The Online Water Quality Index Calculator is Available.
Training Courses on Natural Gas Development and Environmental Concerns
Stream Restoration, Wetlands, Energy, and Water Resources Management 

Actions:

  1. If you have any testing done as part of this action, please consider releasing this data to the Citizen Groundwater and Surface Water Database.  Fill out the attached form and mail the data to the following address:
    Mr. Brian Oram, PG
    Keystone Clean Water Team
    15 Hillcrest Drive
    Dallas, PA 18612
    Please note- if you have baseline testing done already you may have some information on the level of surfactants in the water if you had a MBAS test done.
  2. Informational Screening Testing – Get your water screened for water contamination including isopropanol – Informational Screening Water Kit (Not Certified) Covers about 200 parameters, plus a review of any predrilling data – Only $ 275.00.  Email
  3. Drinking Water Guide for Pennsylvania.

Marcellus Shale Royalty Owners Recovery Proposed Class Action

First – The organization is not pro or con on any issues.  We do not pick sides – we provide fact based information for citizens and landowners.  This came across the desk as part of an education program and we ware providing a post.   If you are a royalty owner in PA I would suggest you read.  The following is not our work.

“Have you been paid all of the royalties you are owed by Chesapeake, Anadarko, Statoil, Mitsui, Chief and other gas companies that hold working interests in your oil and gas lease? Have you been subjected to deductions for post-production costs, such as gathering, transportation or compression, which are either not allowed under the terms of your lease or are arbitrary, excessive, or unreasonable in amount? Are your royalties being calculated based on appropriate gas prices? How have the transactions in which Chesapeake sold its interests in its midstream gathering entity, Access Midstream, for nearly $5 Billion, affected your royalties? What can you do to ensure that your rights and interests are protected and enforced?

Three Pennsylvania law firms — the Law Office of Taunya Knolles Rosenbloom, based in Athens, Bradford County, Griffin, Dawsey, DePaola & Jones, P.C., based in Towanda, Bradford County,  and Indik & McNamara, P.C., based in Philadelphia  —  are pleased to announce that they have joined forces to act as co-counsel in representing Pennsylvania landowners in bringing direct, individual claims, on a group basis, seeking to recover the royalties they are owed under the terms of their oil & gas leases, as well as compensation from the entities responsible for causing them financial harm.

NOTICE OF PRELIMINARY APPROVAL OF CLASS SETTLEMENT IN DEMCHAK PARTNERS CLASS ACTION AND OF DECEMBER 17, 2015 DEADLINE TO OPT-OUT OF PROPOSED CLASS SETTLEMENT

​If you receive royalties in connection with a lease in which Chesapeake holds, or previously held, an interest,  and the lease contains a Market Enhancement Clause, you should be aware that the Court entered an Order on October 2, 2015 certifying a Settlement Class and preliminarily approving the proposed Class Settlement in the Demchak Partners class action case, and establishing December 17, 2015 as the deadline to exclude yourself from the Class Settlement. For more information, see our FAQ page titled How Does the Proposed Class Settlement in the Demchak Partners Class Action Affect Me?

The Bradford County Commissioners have just announced that they will be holding a public forum about the proposed class settlement in the Demchak Partners case on December 2, 2015 at 7 p.m., at theTowanda High School auditorium. We have been invited to make a presentation at the forum, and will be there to field questions and provide information.”

Get More Information at http://www.marcellusroyaltyaction.com

New Tools and Courses

Know Your H20 Phone App and Database Search
Citizen Scientists – The Online Water Quality Index Calculator is Available.
Training Courses on Natural Gas Development and Environmental Concerns
Stream Restoration, Wetlands, and Water Resources Management 

Actions:

  1. If you have any testing done as part of this action, please consider releasing this data to the Citizen Groundwater and Surface Water Database.  Fill out the attached form and mail the data to the following address:
    Mr. Brian Oram, PG
    Keystone Clean Water Team
    15 Hillcrest Drive
    Dallas, PA 18612
    Please note- if you have baseline testing done already you may have some information on the level of surfactants in the water if you had a MBAS test done.
  2. Informational Screening Testing – Get your water screened for water contamination including isopropanol – Informational Screening Water Kit (Not Certified) Covers about 200 parameters, plus a review of any predrilling data – Only $ 275.00.  Email
  3. Drinking Water Guide for Pennsylvania.

PADEP pipeline task force gives 184 recommendations

Note Our Work – Email blast  from PIOGA

A state task force on natural gas pipelines is making 184 recommendations touching on everything from location of pipelines to emergency response plans, all designed to promote “responsible” pipeline development in Pennsylvania. The 335-page document, crafted by the state Department of Environmental Protection’s Pipeline Infrastructure Task Force, has been posted online for public review.

“It is important to remember that the report is not meant to be the final word,” said DEP Secretary John Quigley, who chaired the task force. “When we present our report to the governor in February 2016, I anticipate that the next step will be to determine the feasibility and implementation strategies for each recommendation.”

The 48-member task force was created in May by Governor Tom Wolf to develop policies, guidelines and tools to assist in pipeline development, operation and maintenance.

Recommendations in the draft were assembled by delegates from sectors affected by pipeline development, Quigley noted, including agriculture, communities, environmentalists, cultural resource advocates, industry officials, government agencies and emergency responders.

That lengthy list of recommendations starts with “educate landowners on pipeline development issues.” Other recommendations:

  • Implement full-time environmental inspections during pipeline construction.
  • Monitor water quality during construction.
  • Establish planning coordination between county agencies and pipeline developers.
  • Require pipeline abandonment plans.
  • Standardize emergency response plans and provide 911 addresses for pipeline-related facilities.
  • Do not locate pipelines parallel to waterways within their 100-year floodways.
  • Conduct early outreach with affected communities.
  • Minimize impact on local roads.
  • Create various statewide bodies and processes, including an all-region DEP pipeline review committee, a statewide pipeline information center for the public, and a DEP design manual for pipeline construction.

A 30-day public comment period on the draft report will run through December 14. [Read more]

Please note – there is no assumed responsibility associated with Pipeline Construction for Private Well Impacts – therefore it is important to document baseline conditions for your existing water sources and water wells.  Primary items of concern are aesthetic water quality issues, future methane and other gas releases, spills, local disturbances, discolored water, and related contaminants. The Know Your H20? App for Baseline Testing in PA should help.

New Tools and Courses

Know Your H20 Phone App and Database Search
Citizen Scientists – The Online Water Quality Index Calculator is Available.
Training Courses on Natural Gas Development and Environmental Concerns
Stream Restoration, Wetlands, and Water Resources Management 

Actions:

  1. If you have any testing done as part of this action, please consider releasing this data to the Citizen Groundwater and Surface Water Database.  Fill out the attached form and mail the data to the following address:
    Mr. Brian Oram, PG
    Keystone Clean Water Team
    15 Hillcrest Drive
    Dallas, PA 18612
    Please note- if you have baseline testing done already you may have some information on the level of surfactants in the water if you had a MBAS test done.
  2. Informational Screening Testing – Get your water screened for water contamination including isopropanol – Informational Screening Water Kit (Not Certified) Covers about 200 parameters, plus a review of any predrilling data – Only $ 275.00.  Email
  3. Drinking Water Guide for Pennsylvania.

 

Susquehanna River Basin Commission Study Finds No Impacts on Streams from Marcellus Shale Drilling

SRBC Study Finds No Impacts on Streams from Marcellus Shale Drilling

From 2010 to 2013 the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC) monitored 58 sampling stations in small headwater streams in the Susquehanna River Basin to investigate potential impacts from gas exploration in the Marcellus Shale.  The study recorded pH, temperature, conductivity, inorganic chemistry, TOC, gross alpha and beta radiation, and macroinvertebrates.  The SRBC report, released earlier this year, concluded no discernible relationship between water quality and well pad density.  Please click HERE to download an electronic copy of the report.

New Tools and Courses

Know Your H20 Phone App and Database Search
Citizen Scientists – The Online Water Quality Index Calculator is Available.
Training Courses on Natural Gas Development and Environmental Concerns
Stream Restoration, Wetlands, and Water Resources Management 

Actions:

  1. If you have any testing done as part of this action, please consider releasing this data to the Citizen Groundwater and Surface Water Database.  Fill out the attached form and mail the data to the following address:
    Mr. Brian Oram, PG
    Keystone Clean Water Team
    15 Hillcrest Drive
    Dallas, PA 18612
    Please note- if you have baseline testing done already you may have some information on the level of surfactants in the water if you had a MBAS test done.
  2. Informational Screening Testing – Get your water screened for water contamination including isopropanol – Informational Screening Water Kit (Not Certified) Covers about 200 parameters, plus a review of any predrilling data – Only $ 275.00.  Email
  3. Drinking Water Guide for Pennsylvania.

B.F. Environmental Builds Expertise into New Water Quality Mobile App – Know Your H20?

B.F. Environmental Builds Expertise into New Water Quality Mobile App

Company experts have developed a new tool that will help families stay healthy

 

WILKES-BARRE, PA—September 22, 2015—B.F. Environmental Consultants, an environmental consulting firm providing a range of services throughout the Northeast, announced today the launch of a new mobile app that will make it possible for homeowners to get answers about the quality of their drinking water. Brian Oram, a professional geologist and soil scientist and founder of B.F. Environmental Consultants, developed this new diagnostic tool, called “Know Your H2O?”

“Consumers have fully embraced mobile technologies. If we want to help them, we’re going to have to make our information available to them through their IOS and Android devices,” Oram said. “This new app will put actionable information about water quality into the hands of homeowners all across the country. I’m very proud of this new product.”

Know Your H2O? relies heavily upon the massive online water quality resource the company has made available through the launch of its Water Research Center website. The first version of the software helps consumers diagnose potential water quality problems by exploring aesthetic problems, physical problems, health concerns, or specific problems in their homes. The app is supported by additional content that is directly linked to the Water Research Center.

“This tool helps consumers diagnose problems, but then goes beyond that to provide recommendations for further testing or corrective action,” Oram said. “The app is based on a holistic approach and is guided by concerns about our water, homes, and health. It is a comprehensive tool that can be used by any homeowner, building inspector, water quality professional, or water treatment professional to diagnose a problem and determine next steps.”

For more information about the mobile app or to download your own free copy, visit: http://knowyourh2o.us

About B.F. Environmental Consultants, Inc.

B.F. Environmental Consultants, based in Northeastern Pennsylvania and the Poconos, has been providing professional geological, soils, hydrogeological, and environmental consulting services since 1985. The company specializes in the following areas: hydrogeological and wastewater evaluations for siting land-based wastewater disposal systems; soils consulting (soil scientists), environmental monitoring, overseeing the siting, exploration, and development of community/ commercial water supply sources; environmental training/ professional training courses, and other environmental services. For more information about B.F. Environmental Consultants, visit www.bfenvironmental.com and www.water-research.net.

Ben Franklin’s SGICC Releases Updated Study Summarizing Shale Gas Wastewater Treatment and Disposal

Ben Franklin’s SGICC Releases Updated Study Summarizing Shale Gas Wastewater Treatment and Disposal in Pennsylvania in 2014

 STATE COLLEGE, PA – In 2012 the Ben Franklin Shale Gas Innovation & Commercialization Center (www.sgicc.org) commissioned a study on the status of wastewater being produced in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  Now, three years later, SGICC is updating the report, not only because of the slowdown in the drilling process across the Commonwealth, but also due to the rapid change the shale industry has made in management techniques for the wastewater from shale gas and NGL extraction. See the new 2015 report, as well as the 2012 version, on the SGICC web site at http://www.sgicc.org/research–reports.html.

SGICC hired Wunz Associates, LLC to undertake the study as a follow up to their 2012 effort. An exhaustive search of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) wastewater reporting records was undertaken, coupled with discussions with leading companies treating the wastewater for the industry. In addition to posting the Wunz Associate report at the link above, a second report generated by Eureka Resources, LLC regarding their Standing Stone treatment facility operations in Bradford County, PA and published in SPE International in 2015 is also available.

The most significant finding in the 2015 Wunz report is that volumes classified as “produced water” exceeded those classified as “frac fluid” in 2014.  Bill Hall, SGICC Director notes, “This has occurred largely due to the slowdown in drilling and fracturing of wells by the industry and could reverse again in the future when natural gas and NGL prices rebound and drilling picks up again. Additionally, the amount of produced water is likely to decline over time since it is generated in proportion to the amount of gas or NGLs a well is producing, and that tends to drop off fairly rapidly after the initial years of production.”

Hall also stressed that the majority of the wastewater generated as both “produced” and “frac fluid” are recycled by the industry. In fact, the PADEP records indicate that over 91% of the water is recycled by being used in a future completions project. Recycling is typically done after the water is partially treated to remove solids and other unneeded constituents.

“There may be a point in the future where total frac flowback fluid and produced water volumes do exceed the total volume of water used to fracture wells in the state. But that point has not been reached yet,” noted Hall. “The industry continues to look for innovations in the area of shale wastewater treatment and disposal to address future challenges.”

Online Training Courses

Hydraulic Fracturing (Fracking) – Environmental Issues
Hydraulic Fracturing – The Process
Industrial Water Treatment  and Underground Injection Control
Comprehensive – Petrochemical – Shale Gas Course

Energy Industry in Northeast Pennsylvania

The Speakers conference on growing Pennsylvania industries and business activity around and beyond the drilling of Marcellus Shale gas. The overall theme of this conference is how Pennsylvania – specifically the Northeast and North central regions – can take advantage of Natural Gas resources to build a thriving, diverse economy that will not only weather the ups and downs of commodity prices, but will last for generations to come.

The event will be held on the campus of the Keystone College, just west of the city of Scranton. Full details are below:

 The Energy Industry in Northeast Pennsylvania: Local Benefits and Downstream Development

Keystone College, Brooks Hall Theatre
One College Green
La Plume, PA 18440
Thursday, May 14, 2015
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

The event will feature a series of speakers who will share a variety of perspectives regarding the development of the industry, its impact on local business and job growth, and the potential for future downstream development.

Representatives from local business, government, and education will all be present. Topics may include:

Local business role in the Marcellus supply chain
The benefits of affordable natural gas to manufacturing
Contributions to local government revenues
Job training
Natural gas vehicles and fuels

To Register for this event.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We have offered “Free” Assistance to this effort, but if you are a private well owner that needs assistance we are happy to help.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. CCGG’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable with. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests !

For more information, please go to CCGG’s About Page or contact us.  Follow us on Twitter 

Keystone Clean Water Team is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.    Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission), but we also do local educational workshops and local cellphone/small electronic recycling programs. If you would like to set up a program to help recycle cellphones at an event, business, or other organization.  Through our program we can recycle  cell phones, iPods, game systems, and small digital cameras.  If your interested, please contact us.  Our new PSAs.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).  Keystone Clean Water Team!

Nationwide Program – Neighborhood Environmental Report Your Home Health Status

Nationwide Program – The Keystone Clean Water Team is in pre-launch for a new USA program to help homeowners.  The program helps you to identify the existing and historic environmental hazards in your community.   We are working with a national environmental database search company to offer a report to help you understand your home’s or your future homes environmental health status within a community.  We are doing this by taking a snapshot of the current and historic environmental concerns and hazards in the community and a review of select criminal activity.

The program, Neighborhood Environmental Report™, offers a search of over 1,400 databases and millions of records of potential land and groundwater contamination within 1 mile radius of the entered address.  The report  includes a search for concerns that might be dangerous to a homeowner’s family or investment such as nearby leaking underground oil tanks, leaky underground fuel tanks (LUSTs), leaky above ground tanks (LASTs),  CDC Health Assessment Database,  landfills, hazardous waste sites, DOD facilities, gas and radiological sources, National Wetland Mapping, Flooding mapping data, drug houses, and clandestine drug labs.

gw_day

Healthy Communities = Healthy Kids and Families

Some of the most toxic and/or costly hazards exists outside of your home.  These contaminants can enter your home through direct human or animal contract or vapor intrusion into your home through the air, soil, or groundwater.  These hazards pose a threat to you and your family’s health and the value of your property.    Every report includes detailed information about what has been searched and identified as well as contact information for all governmental and private organizations cited in the databases.

The benefits of this report:

1. Help existing homeowners understand the hazards in their communities.
2. Aid future homeowners quickly learn about the historic hazards and concerns to conduct prior water quality, soils, or environmental testing and get the proper inspections.
3. Aid real estate professionals, investors, and appraisers evaluate the value of a home or residential property.
4. If you are selling your home, what a great way to introduce your home and surrounding community to any potential buyers, and as a home buyer, the Neighborhood Environmental Report helps provide peace of mind for you and your family.
5. For environmental groups, this is a great way to educate and inform your community about existing environmental hazards, develop local targeted sub-watershed monitoring programs, and educate children about their communities.  In some cases a larger search area is needed.
6. Home inspectors, environmental laboratories, and other may find the reports useful, but in many cases some additional review or interpretation will be needed to select the appropriate testing parameters, inspections, and monitoring.

(Example Report Dallas Pennsylvania)

We ran this report for a small business owner that was looking to purchase a residential property in Shavertown, PA.  The property was going to be purchased for cash.  We completed the search and search identified a specific potential problem with a past but active leak at a gasoline station.  This lead the buyer to ask for more information.   When the right questions were asked, it was determined that there may be some environmental hazards that could impact the value of the property.  In addition, the preliminary search suggested that the property could be located  in a floodplain.  The quote from the buyer – “The preliminary information and educational materials allowed me to better understand my risk and allow me to find a new property in a timely manner and save over $ 200,000.00” (GW, Shavertown, PA, 2015).

During the period from 2010 to 2011 – the following are the states with the most “Meth Lab” busts:  Missouri, Tennessee , Indiana , Kentucky, Oklahoma, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

We are in pre-launch on this service.  During pre-launch we are offering to complete compile this report for a fee of only $ 55.00.   After pre-launch and website design, we think the final cost will be $ 75 and up.  If you are interested, please do the following:

1. Order the product using this paypal link.




Cost of Each Report is only $ 55.00
 

2. Contact Mr. Brian Oram at the Keystone Clean Water Team (KCWT) at cleanwater@carbonwaters.org and provide the mailing address for the property, your contact information, email address, and phone number.   We can provide this service for the USA.  For some areas, we may need more information.

Terms and Conditions

1. Reports do not meet the terms and conditions of an environmental audit for real estate translations.
2. Reports can not be resold and the copyright will be maintained by the Keystone Clean Water Team.
3. Any analyses, estimates, ratings or risk codes provided in this Report are provided for illustrative purposes only, and are not intended to provide, nor should they be interpreted as providing any facts regarding, or prediction or forecast of, any environmental risk for any property. Only a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment performed by an environmental professional can provide information regarding the environmental risk for any property. This Report is not a replacement for a home inspection. This Report does not provide information pertaining to the interior of the target property such as, but not limited to: mold, asbestos, lead, radon or other issues. Additionally, the information provided in this Report is not to be construed as legal advice.
4. This report contains certain information described herein pertaining solely to the exterior of the target property, which information was obtained from a variety of public and other sources reasonably available to the database search company. The company. does not produce, maintain or verify the information contained in these sources; and assumes, without independent investigation, that the information in such sources is accurate and complete.

Everything we do began with an idea.

We have offered “Free” Assistance to this effort, but if you are a private well owner that needs assistance we are happy to help.

We realize your time is precious and the world is hectic. KCWT’s volunteers do only what they’re comfortable. It can be a little or a lot.  Get YOUR WATER Tested – Discounted Screening Tests, posting articles on social media, or assisting with a local event !

For more information, please go to KCWT’s About Page or contact us.  Follow us on Twitter 

Keystone Clean Water Team is a 501(c)(3) IRS approved nonprofit, volunteer organization and your donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.    Unsolicited donations are appreciated (Helps us complete our mission), but we also do local educational workshops and local cellphone/small electronic recycling programs. If you would like to set up a program to help recycle cellphones at an event, business, or other organization.  Through our program we can recycle  cell phones, iPods, game systems, and small digital cameras.  If your interested, please contact us.  Our new PSAs.

Help the Organization and Get Your Water Tested or Order the Private Well Owner Guide (proceeds benefit This Organization).  Keystone Clean Water Team!

ATSDR Initial Study Finds Elevated Levels of Radon Gas, Radium in Polycythemia Vera Study Area in Pennsylvania

ATLANTA (7/2014)—Some homes in Carbon, Luzerne, and Schuylkill counties of Pennsylvania have elevated levels of radon gas in indoor air and radium in soils, according to a health consultation released today by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). Researchers were unable to determine if a cluster of cases of Polycythemia Vera (PV) in people living in the counties is related to exposures to the substances.

The report provides an analysis of radiologic sampling information researchers reviewed to learn more about the possible cluster of PV cases in northeastern Pennsylvania. PV is a rare form of cancer of the blood that causes the body to make too many red blood cells. It occurs more often in men than women, and is rare in patients under age 40.

“Based on analysis of the samples, ATSDR considers the exposures to radon gas in indoor air at these homes to be of public health concern and encourages residents living in the study area to have their homes tested,” said Lora Werner, Director, ATSDR Region III. “The elevated levels of radium in soils are not considered to be a health risk but may be worthy of further study.”

At the request of ATSDR, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) collected and analyzed environmental samples within the tri-county area and ATSDR evaluated the possible health effects of exposure to the radiological elements in the samples.

The ATSDR report also found:

  • Some houses in the study area had elevated levels of radon gas in indoor air. Radon gas was also found in the private well water of some homes.
  • Soils from the study area had slightly elevated levels of radium.
  • Without additional information, ATSDR cannot determine if the cluster of cases of PV disease in the tri-county area is related to the radiological exposures observed in the environmental sampling information.

This report is part of a larger investigation of the cluster of cases of PV in northeast Pennsylvania. Overall, there are 18 projects in four areas for investigation: epidemiology, genetics, toxicology, and environmental analysis. The findings of these projects will provide information about PV and other blood disorders, as well as share information on environmental investigations in the study area.

ATSDR recommends:

  • All residents in the study area should have their homes tested for radon gas. Houses with elevated radon levels should be retested. If a home is retested and elevated radon levels continue, residents should contact the state of Pennsylvania radon program hotline at 1-800-237-2366 and request additional information on how to reduce the radon levels in the home.
  • People in homes with high levels of radon in their drinking water should contact the PADEP Radon Program for assistance. Home water supplies can be treated to reduce radon levels.

The health consultation report on radon gas and radium in the PV study area is available at:www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/polycythemia_vera.

For more information, please call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636). Please request information about: “Review of Radiological Data Measured in the Polycythemia Vera Investigation Study Area in Carbon, Luzerne, and Schuylkill Counties.

Our Radon Portal – Links to Air and Water Testing -Outside of Study Area –http://www.water-research.net/index.php/radon

###

ATSDR, a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, evaluates the potential for adverse human health effects of exposure to hazardous substances in the environment.

Participated in Jessup Panel Discussion on Invenergy

Participated in a Panel Discussion at the request of Representative Frank Farina – I have not worked on the Invenergy Project and I was requested to be available to answer questions related to geology, hydrogeology, water quality, regulatory process, environmental impacts, stormwater issues, and stream related matters.  Prior to attending the event, I visited the site and reviewed the available soils, geologic, and water quality data.  I attended the panel discussion with Q/A – a link to a series can be found at the following webportal.  I strongly suggest you watch video 6.

During the Panel discussion the following questions were raised

1. How are discharge limits sets?   The PADEP set the discharge limits for a facility based on the average and peak discharge flow, existing stream quality, existing stream flow, classification of the stream, and the nature of downgradient users.

2. Have the discharge limits been set? No -the discharge limits have not been set for the stream and the peak flow is 600,000 gpd and a potential average flow is 400,000 gpd.

3. Will the discharge adversely impact the stream?  The process the PADEP uses is designed to have no adverse impact on the stream.  The PADEP will set discharge limits to prevent and adverse impact on the stream or no impact on the stream depending on the stream quality and classification.   For this project, a critical design parameter will be temperature and most likely the design of the outlet structure.

4. What chemicals will be used in the water treatment process?  This can not be known until the PADEP sets the limits.  The PADEP has a list of allowed chemicals that could be used and are pre-approved.  The list is here.   Note:  This is a list of all the chemicals PADEP has approved for a variety of processes and projects and NOT This Project.  This list is not project or site specific.

5. Is it possible that PADEP may set limits that are not attainable?  This should not happen, but it may.

6. Limits are set via a NPDES permit process?  This process will likely require daily monitoring of the treatment process (incoming water, within process, discharge water) – Certified water testing on a monthly basis – continuous flow monitoring and most likely consist monitoring of pH, temperature, conductivity, and oxygen.  The monitoring program will likely include upstream and downstream monitoring of water quality and maybe flow.

7. Water Withdrawal ?  Is there enough water ?   It appears that the water company has been allocated sufficient water for the area.  The allocation process is controlled by the SRBC (Susquehanna River Basin Commission).  They regulate the initial water allocation, create a docket, and would have to approve any docket modifications.  This may be a docket modification by the SRBC.  This would be an excellent time to put in-place in-stream water quality monitoring for the watershed.  It was suggested that in-stream monitoring with a web-portal to access daily was being considered.

8. In a drought what happens?  SRBC controls allocation via the docket – plant would have to apply to provisions.  If this means going off line to meet requirements – this is what would have to happen.  The plant could attempt to develop some backup or supplemental sources.

9. Geology for the area ? Any issues ?  There does appear to be some historic strip mining and soil mapping suggests some urban dumping.  The bedrock is typical of the Llewellyn  Formation (coal bearing formation) and the Pottsville Formation (sandstone).   The area has no mapped sinkholes, faults, or known geologic hazards.

Video of the Event (20 separate videos – please watch Number 6)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PLKfoQ6aX-A06NVXkLsZ4sbjRNSgCm9ogO&v=1CVr-Gvpenw

News Coverage

http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/business/jessup-power-plant-plan-latest-since-shale-boom-began-1.1532435

http://wnep.com/2015/03/31/action-16-is-invenergy-a-good-neighbor/

In Video 6 – I had to interpret a question because what the person was doing was not asking a question but making a statement that was not true and correct.  For the record,

1. I have never sponsored an oil and gas energy event.
2. I have never sponsored an energy event dinner.
3. I did not attend the event in question, but I did get a free invitation to the event because I subscribe to an online newsletter about environmental and oil and gas issues through out the US.  This free invitation was to the event only and I would have to pay for lunch.  I did register, but I did not attend the event.
4. Rather than attending the event, I helped the DCNR with a program that was scheduled for the Tues before and Thursday after on environmental issues with natural gas development, but because a tour for a drilling site could not be set-up we did a tour and water testing of a salt water spring in Susquehanna County, PA.
5. As a fallout of the tour- we are in the process of raising funds to help purchase 3-Phosphate testing meters for the DCNR Program – estimated cost $ 2000.00.  Send donations via this portal.  The next $ 2K raised will go to buying the water quality meters.

Added Link to Article I found from Charlie Charlesworth on the event

Everything we do began with an idea.

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